Eric Gagne says 80 percent of his Dodgers teammates used steroids


Former Dodgers closer Eric Gagne has a new biography coming out. And he’s droppin’ bombs: He says that 80 percent of his Dodgers teammates were using PEDS:

In the book, Gagne does not provide any names of players he says used PEDs. Baseball began stricter testing in the spring of 2006. Players are subject to HGH testing during spring training and in the offseason, but not during the season.

“I was intimately aware of the clubhouse in which I lived. I would say that 80 percent of the Dodgers players were consuming them,” Gagne says in the book.

That’s … a lot.

Gagne played for the Dodgers from 1999-2006. His best season — 2003 — came right before the onset of PED testing. On that team was Mitchell Report veterans Paul Lo Duca and Kevin Brown.  Two-time testing loser Guillermo Mota was there too.  There are other interesting names who played on those early 2000s Dodgers teams too, in big and small roles. Many of whom — if they were specifically outed — would create quite an uproar.

If he’s telling the truth it certainly paints an even more stark picture of PED use in that era.  But it also reveals just how unfair it is to single out certain individual players from that era and pretending that they were uniquely villainous.

Henderson Alvarez signs with Tigres de Quintana Roo

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Free agent right-hander Henderson Alvarez signed a deal with the Tigres de Quintana Roo of the Mexican Baseball League earlier this week, FanRag Sports’ Jon Heyman reported Friday. The righty wasn’t necessarily too fringey a player to hack it in the big leagues, but there were no MLB takers in attendance during his showcase in Venezuela last month and he clearly felt it best to try his luck elsewhere.

The 27-year-old’s last major league gig came with the Phillies, for whom he delivered a 4.30 ERA, 6.8 BB/9 and 3.7 SO/9 over 14 2/3 innings in 2017. While he’s not too far removed from his first and only All-Star bid in 2014, he was besieged by shoulder issues in 2015 and 2016 and underwent season-ending surgeries as a result.

That added injury risk, coupled with the fact that he hasn’t pitched more than 22 innings in a single season since 2014, may have been too much for major league teams to take on this spring. Assuming he steers clear of further injuries, however, a return to the majors may not be entirely out of the question in years to come.