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A different take on the native iconography in sports argument

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I have a go at Chief Wahoo every six months or so. It’s just what I do.  But I’ll grant that it gets old arguing that Chief Wahoo should go away simply because he’s offensive.

Why? Because it never solves anything. Despite the fact that it is 100% rationally undeniable that Chief Wahoo is offensive, there will always be people who come back with all kinds of complicated, contrived nonsense to say he isn’t because if they don’t their childhood will be ruined or something. I dunno. Ask them. It’s hard to hear their arguments what with all of that mouth-breathing.

Anyway, today Paul Lukas tries to sidestep the basic offensiveness argument — about not just Wahoo, but over native American iconography in general — with this tack:

I see this as more of an intellectual property issue. Basically, for those of us who aren’t Native American (which basically means the vast majority of the people who reading this), I don’t think we have the right to use images of headdresses, tomahawks, tribe names, and so on. It’s not a question of whether such symbols are offensive, or whether they perpetuate outdated stereotypes; it’s that they don’t belong to us. If a non-Jewish group used a menorah or a Star of David in its marketing, wouldn’t that raise a few eyebrows? Ditto for a non-military group using a Purple Heart. And if those examples don’t pass the smell test, neither does a sports team using Native American iconography.

I guess I can see where he’s coming from, but I submit that there are all manner of businesses in this country that use some sort of naming or iconography that doesn’t really belong to them. There are thousands of little shops, campgrounds, restaurants, you name it, that use some sort of name or iconography from some sort of ethnic group or singularly respected group of any kind, despite having no connection to them at all.  People exploit Memorial Day for mattress sales, for cryin’ out loud.

I’m not saying Lukas is wrong here. He makes a good argument, but I still think the best argument is that these things are just offensive.

Oh, and finally: before you wade into the comments with your “what about the Fighting Irish!” idiocy, read ALL of Lukas’ column. There he deals with the usual counter-arguments and dispatches them pretty deftly.

New Jersey woman files suit against the Brewers after being struck by a batting practice foul ball

PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA - APRIL 11: New protective netting now protects lower deck fans from dugout to dugout at Citizens Bank Park before an opening day game between the San Diego Padres and Philadelphia Phillies on April 11, 2016 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. (Photo by Rich Schultz/Getty Images)
Rich Schultz/Getty Images
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A woman from Camden County in New Jersey has filed suit against the Milwaukee Brewers after being struck by a foul ball during batting practice two years ago at Miller Park, Jeff Goldman of NJ.com reports. According to her lawsuit, she suffered an orbital fracture to her left eye socket, nerve and iris damage, and a concussion.

The woman, Dana Morelli, was in the second row behind third base along with her fiancee and his son when she was struck by the foul ball. She had to remain in a dark room in Milwaukee before being able to safely travel home. (Sensitivity to light is a common symptom of a concussion.)

Fan safety has become a hot button topic recently. This past December, Major League Baseball issued safety recommendations but ultimately left it up to each ballpark to decide by how much to extend the netting.

Earlier this month, Phillies infielder Freddy Galvis fouled off a pitch that struck a fan. After the game, he clamored for the Phillies to increase protective netting at Citizens Bank Park to extend to the seats behind the dugout, where the fan was hit. Another fan was hit the next day and Galvis threw up his hands in frustration. While fans and owners seem to mostly be against netting, the players seem to be for it.

Mike Leake placed on the disabled list with shingles

Mike Leake
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The Cardinals have placed starter Mike Leake on the 15-day disabled list, retroactive to August 22, with shingles. Which: ugh. Anyone I’ve ever known who has had it wouldn’t wish it on their worst enemy.

Leake was diagnosed with the virus last week and had to be scratched from his scheduled start Saturday versus the Athletics. There is no timetable for Leake’s return. Leake is 9-9 with a 4.56 ERA in 25 starts for the Cardinals. Poor dude.