Josh Hamilton back in Rangers lineup, blames caffeine and sports drinks for vision problems

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After missing the past five-and-a-half games with what was initially called a sinus infection and subsequent vision problems Josh Hamilton is back in the Rangers’ lineup tonight against the A’s.

However, the diagnosis has changed somewhat. According to Richard Durrett of ESPN Dallas the Rangers “say Hamilton has ocular keratitis, which is blurred vision from too much caffeine and sports drinks” and “the cornea dries because of it.”

Well, that’s certainly a new one (and presumably unrelated to his tobacco issues from last month). Johns Hopkins’ website has a whole lot more information on Hamilton’s condition if you’re interested.

Craig Gentry filled in for Hamilton, starting all five games in center field with Nelson Cruz and David Murphy in the outfield corners. Hamilton is batting third and playing center field tonight and he’ll try to reclaim the AL home run lead after Miguel Cabrera tied him over the weekend. Hamilton, who has 42 homers in 138 games compared to 42 homers in 151 games for Cabrera, also ranks second among AL hitters with 123 RBIs behind Cabrera’s league-leading 133.

Report: MLB likely to unilaterally implement pace of play changes

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ESPN’s Jerry Crasnick reports that talks between Major League Baseball and the MLB Players’ Association concerning pace of play changes have stalled, which makes it more likely that commissioner Rob Manfred unilaterally implements the changes he seeks. Those changes include a pitch clock and a restriction on catcher mound visits.

Manfred said, “My preferred path is a negotiated agreement with the players. But if we can’t get an agreement, we are going to have rule changes in 2018, one way or the other.”

The players have made several suggestions aimed at reducing the length of games, such as amending replay review rules, strictly monitoring down time between innings, and bringing back bullpen carts.

It is believed that MLB is proposing a pitch clock of 20 seconds. If a pitcher takes too long between pitches, he will have a ball added to the count. If the hitter takes too long, then he will have a strike added to the count.