Orioles, Yankees drop one-run games

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A pair of lengthy winning streaks came to an end Sunday, as both the Yankees and Orioles lost one-run games to keep the status quo atop the AL East.

The Orioles saw their six-game streak conclude in losing 2-1 to Boston. Baltimore caught a very bad break in the top of the ninth, when Jim Thome’s hard shot to right skipped over the low right-field wall at Fenway for a ground-rule double, preventing Mark Reynolds from scoring from first and tying the game. The O’s went on to strand the bases loaded against Andrew Bailey.

Today’s game did mark the debut of the game’s top pitching prospect, 19-year-old right-hander Dylan Bundy. Bundy got flyouts from both batters he faced and showed a 92-94 mph fastball in his first appearance since starting for Double-A Bowie on Aug. 28.

The Yankees, who had won seven straight, fell a few minutes later, as the A’s salvaged one game in Yankee Stadium by prevailing 5-4.

The game featured more shaky umpiring, most of it coming from home-plate umpire Mike Estabrook. Complaining about the first of his three strikeouts on the day, Alex Rodriguez could be heard telling Estabrook that the called third strike was “on the ground.” It was a slight exaggeration, but it was definitely low. Later, Nick Swisher was rung up on a pair of curveballs that were clearly outside. Robinson Cano also had something to say about the called strike three that ended the game in the ninth, but that one seemed to have plenty of corner.

Also damaging: Larry Vanover missed on a bang-bang play at first base in the second inning, giving Josh Donaldson a single. Cliff Pennington later hit a two-run homer in the frame.

Oakland’s bullpen deserves much of the credit for the win. Jerry Blevins, Ryan Cook, Sean Doolittle and Grant Balfour combined to pitch 4 2/3 scoreless innings in relief of A.J. Griffin. Hiroki Kuroda took the loss for the Yankees after giving up five runs — four earned — in 5 2/3 innings.

Since both the Orioles and Yankees both ended up winning two out of three this weekend, the Yankees still have their one-game lead in the AL East. The A’s will have either a 2 1/2- or 3 1/2-game lead in the wild card, pending the Angels’ outcome today.

David Wright isn’t ready to retire

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There’s no doubt that the last three years have put David Wright through the ringer. The Mets third baseman missed the bulk of his 2015 season with spinal stenosis and made it through a month of games in 2016 before undergoing season-ending surgery to repair a herniated disc in his neck. In 2017, a bout of shoulder impingement, rotator cuff surgery and a laminotomy procedure on his lower back kept him off the field for all 162 games.

Despite the continual setbacks, Wright told MLB.com’s Anthony DiComo, he doesn’t believe retirement is in the cards for him this year. “When the end comes, the end comes,” he said Friday. “Hopefully, I’ve got a little more left. But I guess that’s to be determined.”

The 35-year-old last appeared for High-A St. Lucie in 2017, powering through three games with one hit and five strikeouts in 10 plate appearances. His career has advanced in fits and starts since 2015, but you don’t have to do too much digging to find his last great performance with the Mets. Wright earned his seventh career All-Star berth in 2013, slashing .307/.390/.514 with 18 home runs and a terrific 6.0 fWAR in 492 PA. While he isn’t expected to mash at those levels in the near future, if ever again, the Mets believe the veteran third baseman might still have something left in the tank as he tries to extend a 13-year run in the majors.

Per DiComo, the only thing standing in his way is a clean bill of health — not just for the upcoming season, but for the years to come. Wright said he wouldn’t risk returning to the field if it came with long-term implications for his quality of life.

The surgeries are obviously serious stuff, but it just kind of plays with your mind mentally, where you don’t know how your body’s going to hold up,” Wright said. “You don’t know how you’re going to feel a month from now. You don’t know how you’re going to feel a couple weeks from now. You’re hoping that it continues to get better, but you just don’t know.

Given the uncertainty that surrounds his return to the game, it’s a prudent outlook to have.