Orioles, Yankees drop one-run games

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A pair of lengthy winning streaks came to an end Sunday, as both the Yankees and Orioles lost one-run games to keep the status quo atop the AL East.

The Orioles saw their six-game streak conclude in losing 2-1 to Boston. Baltimore caught a very bad break in the top of the ninth, when Jim Thome’s hard shot to right skipped over the low right-field wall at Fenway for a ground-rule double, preventing Mark Reynolds from scoring from first and tying the game. The O’s went on to strand the bases loaded against Andrew Bailey.

Today’s game did mark the debut of the game’s top pitching prospect, 19-year-old right-hander Dylan Bundy. Bundy got flyouts from both batters he faced and showed a 92-94 mph fastball in his first appearance since starting for Double-A Bowie on Aug. 28.

The Yankees, who had won seven straight, fell a few minutes later, as the A’s salvaged one game in Yankee Stadium by prevailing 5-4.

The game featured more shaky umpiring, most of it coming from home-plate umpire Mike Estabrook. Complaining about the first of his three strikeouts on the day, Alex Rodriguez could be heard telling Estabrook that the called third strike was “on the ground.” It was a slight exaggeration, but it was definitely low. Later, Nick Swisher was rung up on a pair of curveballs that were clearly outside. Robinson Cano also had something to say about the called strike three that ended the game in the ninth, but that one seemed to have plenty of corner.

Also damaging: Larry Vanover missed on a bang-bang play at first base in the second inning, giving Josh Donaldson a single. Cliff Pennington later hit a two-run homer in the frame.

Oakland’s bullpen deserves much of the credit for the win. Jerry Blevins, Ryan Cook, Sean Doolittle and Grant Balfour combined to pitch 4 2/3 scoreless innings in relief of A.J. Griffin. Hiroki Kuroda took the loss for the Yankees after giving up five runs — four earned — in 5 2/3 innings.

Since both the Orioles and Yankees both ended up winning two out of three this weekend, the Yankees still have their one-game lead in the AL East. The A’s will have either a 2 1/2- or 3 1/2-game lead in the wild card, pending the Angels’ outcome today.

Adam Eaton sustains leg injury after tripping over first base

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Nationals’ outfielder Adam Eaton was carried off the field after stumbling over first base on Friday night. In the ninth inning of the Nationals’ 7-5 loss to the Mets, Eaton appeared to catch his ankle on the bag as he ran out an infield single, suffering a leg injury on the fall. He was unable to put pressure on his left leg after the play and required assistance by two of the Nationals’ athletic trainers as he exited the field.

Eaton is scheduled to undergo an MRI on Saturday, but Nationals’ manager Dusty Baker told reporters that it “doesn’t look too good.” It’s the first significant leg injury the outfielder has sustained since 2014, when he went on the 15-day disabled list with a hamstring strain. He’ll likely be replaced by Michael Taylor in center field for the next couple of games, though that could be a temporary fix as the Nationals seek a better solution during Eaton’s recovery process.

Madison Bumgarner likely sidelined through the All-Star break

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It’s been just over a week since Giants’ left-hander Madison Bumgarner got a serious scare after a nasty dirt bike accident. He escaped with bruised ribs and a Grade 2 strain of his left shoulder AC joint, but there was some speculation that the injuries would cause a significant, if not permanent, setback in the southpaw’s career. Thankfully, things aren’t looking quite so bleak today. Not only will Bumgarner not require surgery, but he could return as soon as the week following the All-Star break, the Giants said Friday.

Of course, that timeline is wholly dependent on how smoothly the recovery process goes, so nothing is set in stone yet. NBC Sports Bay Area’s Alex Pavlovic estimates 2-3 months of rest and rehab, including “two months before he can get back on the mound and then another three to four weeks of throwing and rehab starts before he’s big league-ready.” It’s a long and laborious schedule, but still looks much better than any surgical alternative.

Prior to the accident, Bumgarner was working on a solid start to the 2017 season. He maintained a 3.00 ERA, 1.3 BB/9 and 9.3 SO/9 through 27 innings with the club, though his average 1.75 runs of support per start fed into an 0-3 record.