Chipper Jones on the Wild Card playoff game: “It’s stupid”

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Barring an amazing hot streak to overtake the Nationals in the NL East the Braves will be matched up against the other Wild Card team in a one-game playoff and Chipper Jones is not a big fan of the idea.

“I think it’s stupid, to be honest with you,” Jones said today, via David O’Brien of the Atlanta Journal Constitution.

Jones went on to say that he understands the appeal and drama of the one-game playoff, but the 40-year-old future Hall of Famer with 92 career postseason games played thinks one game is too much of a crap shoot:

But Major Lague Baseball wants a bunch of teams in the playoffs. There’s nothing like cut-throat baseball for the fans. And people love that 163rd regular-season game. They’ve loved it in the past. I’m sure that’s probably what’s promoted a second wild-card team. I wish they would’ve done it a year earlier so we would have had a chance last year. But it is what it is.

You say to yourself, we could possibly have the second- or third-best record in the National League when the season’s over and we have to play a one-game playoff just to get in. That doesn’t seem fair because anything can happen. Now if you were to say the two wild-card teams will play a best two-out-of-three, I’d be OK with that. … I think it’s more fair from a standpoint that anything can happen in one game – a blown call by an umpire, a bad day at the office … at least in a two-of-three-game series you have some sort of leeway.

That’s a very stat-heady, Billy Beane-like take on the whole thing (you know, small sample sizes and all). I tend to agree with Chipper and wonder how the overall reaction to the Wild Card-related changes in the postseason format will change if a team like the Braves wins, say, 93 games only to lose a one-game playoff to a team with, say, 85 wins.

They’re basically coin-flipping to get into the “real” playoffs and that’s an awful lot of fun to watch, no doubt, but it’s going to make for some very disappointed losing teams.

Joe Maddon: “I have a defensive foot fetish.”

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The Cubs’ defense — or lack thereof this year — has been a topic of conversation as it could help explain why the team hasn’t played at the elite level it played at last year.

Manager Joe Maddon tried to go into detail about that but ended up channeling his inner Rex Ryan. Via CSN Chicago’s Patrick Mooney.

Well then.

The Nationals have scored 62 runs during four Joe Ross starts

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If, in the future, Joe Ross ever complains about a lack of run support, point to his first four starts of the 2017 season.

Ross started on April 19 in Atlanta against the Braves, on April 25 in Colorado against the Rockies, on April 30 at home against the Mets, and on May 23 at home against the Mariners. In those games, the Nats’ offense scored 14, 15, 23, and 10 runs respectively for a total of 62 runs, or an average of 15.5 per start. Ross was the pitcher of record for seven, eight, 10, and 10 runs for a total of 35 runs (8.75 runs per start), which would still make him the major league leader in run support by that restrictive standard.

Among qualified starters — Ross did not qualify — entering Tuesday’s action, the Rockies’ Antonio Senzatela led the way according to ESPN, averaging 7.11 runs of support in nine starts. The Rockies scored double-digit runs in only three of those starts, oddly enough.

Per the Nationals, the 62 runs of support for Ross is a major league record in a pitcher’s first four starts of a season.