Marlins plan to fire longtime GM/president Larry Beinfest

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Larry Beinfest was hired as the Marlins’ general manager when Jeffrey Loria took over as owner in 2002 and was later promoted to president of baseball operations, but after an offseason spending spree followed by a disappointing season he’s reportedly on the way out.

Bob Nightengale of USA Today spoke to “two high-ranking executives” who say the Marlins “are planning to fire Beinfest … perhaps as early as next week.”

According to Nightengale the Marlins will promote assistant general Dan Jennings to replace him. Meanwhile, he writes that manager Ozzie Guillen is expected to keep his job with three years remaining on a $10 million contract.

Under Beinfest the Marlins won the World Series in 2003 and, despite frequently having one of the league’s lowest payrolls until now, have had winning seasons in five of his 11 years. However, the team’s last winning season came in 2009 and it’s no surprise that someone is taking the fall for the free-spending offseason likely leading to 90-plus losses moving into the new ballpark.

Yankees to hire Josh Bard as their new bench coach

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Aaron Boone has no experience as a coach or a manager at any level. As such, some have speculated that he’d hire a more seasoned hand as his bench coach as he begins his first season as Yankees manager. Someone like, say, Eric Wedge, who was a candidate for the job Boone got and who once managed Boone in Cleveland.

Nope. According to MLB.com’s Mark Feinsand, he’s going with Josh Bard.

Bard, 39, was a teammate of Boone’s with the Indians in 2005. He’s not without coaching experience, having spent the last two seasons as the Dodgers’ bullpen coach, but he’s not that Gene Lamont/Don Zimmer-type we often see in the bench coach role.

Which is fine because different managers want different things from their bench coach. Some are strategy guys, helping with in-game decision making. Others are relationship guys who help managers understand all of the dynamics of the clubhouse while they’re worrying more about lineups and stuff. Others are trust guys, who can serve as the manager’s sounding board, among other things. Some are combinations of all of these things. As Feinsand notes in his story, Boone said at his introductory press conference that he’s looking for this:

“I want smart sitting next to me. I want confidence sitting next to me. I want a guy who can walk out into that room and as I talk about relationships I expect to have with my players, I expect that even to be more so with my coaching staff. Whether that is a guy with all kinds of experience or little experience. I am not concerned about that.”