Jeremy Hefner can’t get an out against the Phillies

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The Mets’ Jeremy Hefner was pulled from his start Thursday against the Phillies after failing to retire any of the seven batters he faced.

Hefner gave up six singles in a row, including a bunt single to Juan Pierre, and then walked Kevin Frandsen with the bases loaded before being replaced by Collin McHugh.

Since all three inherited runners came around to score of McHugh, Hefner was charged with seven earned runs.

Hefner is the fifth starter this year to leave without retiring a batter, but the first to do so due to ineffectiveness. Jered Weaver, P.J. Walters and Brandon Morrow were injured in their starts, and Zack Greinke was ejected from his.

The last starter to depart under circumstances similar to Hefner’s was the Cubs’ Randy Wells on May 28, 2010. He gave up hits to all six batters he faced before being removed from an outing against the Cardinals.

Hefner became the eighth starter since 2000 to give up seven runs without recording an out:

Armando Reynoso (Ari): Apr. 23, 2000 vs. SF
Dennis Tankersley (SD): Apr. 9, 2003 vs. SF
Paul Wilson (Cin): July 10, 2003 vs. Hou (8 R, 7 ER)
Ryan Vogelsong (Pit): Sept. 24, 2004 vs. Cin
Paul Wilson (Cin): May 6, 2005 vs. LAD (8 ER)
J.D. Durbin (Phi): Sept. 1, 2007 vs. Fla
Jason Marquis (Was): Apr. 18, 2010 vs. Mil

Marlins intend to keep Christian Yelich

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With Giancarlo Stanton and Marcell Ozuna gone, the next logical step for the Marlins would be to trade away Christian Yelich. He’s be an amazingly attractive trade candidate given that he is under team control through 2022, and is owed a very reasonable $58 million or so. He just turned 26 last week and has hit .290/.369/.432 in his five year career. That’s the kind of player and contract that could bring back a mess of prospects.

Except the Marlins, it seems, don’t want to do that. Multiple reports have come out in the last hour saying that the Marlins intend to hold on to Yelich and to build around him.

That could be a negotiating ploy, of course. They’ll no doubt listen to offers and, if the right one comes along, they’d certainly give strong consideration to trading him. A good deal is a good deal.

The only question, in light of the events of the last week, is whether the Marlins would know a good deal if they saw one.