Tim Lincecum has a 3.06 ERA since the All-Star break

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Tim Lincecum isn’t quite back to being his old, Cy Young-winning self in terms of raw stuff or performance, but he’s bounced back from a terrible first half to quietly pitch very well for the past two months.

At the All-Star break Lincecum was 3-10 with a 6.42 ERA in 18 starts.

Since the All-Star break Lincecum is 7-4 with a 3.06 ERA in 13 starts.

He’s pitched better, no doubt, but it’s also worth noting that his secondary numbers in the first half weren’t nearly as bad as his ERA. For instance Lincecum struck out 104 batters in 98 innings before the break, which suggests he was anything but totally washed up and is actually a higher strikeout rate than he has in the second half.

Much of the difference in his performance came from the fact that Lincecum’s batting average on balls in play was .338 in the first half–which is very high–and is now .304 in the second half. In other words, when some of the bloopers stopped falling for hits and some of the line drives started finding gloves Lincecum magically ceased giving up runs in bunches.

You may want to attribute that to a change in luck or a change in approach or a change in the quality of his pitching, but whatever the case it’s nice to see Lincecum thriving again. And after 6.1 shutout innings against the Rockies last night his overall ERA is under 5.00 for the first time all season.

Brandon Phillips hit his 200th career home run

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Braves second baseman Brandon Phillips became the 337th player in baseball history to hit 200 career home runs, driving a solo home run to left-center field during Monday night’s home game against the Pirates. Phillips is the 14th second baseman (who played a min. of 75 percent of his career games at the position) to rack up at least 200 career home runs.

Phillips, 35, entered Monday’s action batting .290/.345/.405 with two home runs and 12 RBI in 142 plate appearances. If he’s anything, he’s consistent, as he finished with an adjusted OPS between 90-99 (100 is average) every year between 2012-16 and it was sitting at 97 coming into Monday.

Video: Albert Almora, Jr. lays out to make a great catch in deep right-center field

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Cubs center fielder Albert Almora, Jr. robbed Giants first baseman Brandon Belt of at least a double in the top of the first inning of Monday’s game at Wrigley Field. Almora completely left his feet to catch the ball before landing just shy of the warning track.

The Giants took the early lead two batters prior to Belt’s at-bat as Joe Panik hit a solo home run to center field.