David Robertson’s woes a worry for Yankees

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With Rafael Soriano and left fielder Ichiro Suzuki combining to bail him out of an eighth-inning jam, David Robertson didn’t take his fourth loss in his last 10 appearances today in the first game of a doubleheader against the Blue Jays.  He came pretty close, though.

Robertson gave up hits to four of the six batters he faced and allowed two runs while getting two outs today. His struggles forced the Yankees to bring in their closer in the eighth, something they certainly didn’t want to do in the first of two games on the day.

Now they’ll enter the second game versus Toronto with their closer having already thrown 23 pitches today and the setup man 26, making one wonder how they might deal with a late lead should one arise.

Robertson, who is 1-7 on the year, has allowed seven runs in nine innings this month. On the plus side, it’s not due to walks, which were an early career problem for him. In fact, he has an 11/0 K/BB ratio in September. He also has a fine 2.98 ERA for the season. He is getting hit, though. He’s given up five homers and 50 hits in 54 1/3 innings this season. Last year, he allowed one homer and 40 hits in 66 2/3 innings.

Yankees pitchers are pretty much conditioned to go seven innings a start. In fact, Yankees starters have recorded a total of one out after the seventh inning this month (Phil Hughes went 7 1/3 innings against Boston last week). Robertson is going to be a very important piece in any deep run into the postseason. Nothing in the way he’s throwing suggests that he can’t bounce back, but if he doesn’t, the Bombers are going to have problems.

Watch: George Springer robs Todd Frazier with an incredible catch at the wall

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Perhaps there are a few who still miss the slope of Tal’s Hill rising from center field, but George Springer isn’t one of them. He lassoed a 403-foot fly ball from Todd Frazier in the seventh inning of Game 6, reaching nearly to the top of the wall to prevent the Yankees from gaining on the Astros’ 3-0 lead.

According to Statcast, a fly ball with an exit velocity of 103.6 MPH and a launch angle of 29 degrees lands for a home run 72% of the time. That wasn’t going to fly with the Astros, who were facing runners on first and second with one out and saw Justin Verlander‘s pitch count rapidly approaching 100.

It wasn’t long before the Yankees tried for another home run, however, and this one sailed far above the heads of all of the Astros’ outfielders. Aaron Judge lofted a 425-foot shot to left field in the eighth inning, destroying a first-pitch fastball from Brad Peacock and finally getting New York on the board.

The Yankees currently trail the Astros 4-1 in the bottom of the eighth.