A note on awards season

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I had some fun with the Ted Williams post this morning, but I would like to make one observation about the upcoming MVP debates and awards season in general:  they matter and they don’t. And that’s not necessarily a contradiction.

Remember that time when the voters got the MVP vote wrong and we all died? God, that sucked.  Oh, wait, that didn’t happen. Because no one is truly harmed if the MVP voters screw up. Amazingly, that even held when Alan Trammell was ripped off in 1987, and I was pretty sure that was going to kill me. In that sense, no, the awards debates don’t truly matter.

At the same time, the opposite reaction — that since it’s just baseball awards these debates are not even worth having — is also dumb.  We’re baseball fans. Arguing about awards is the best possible way to spend one’s time when actual games aren’t on. What the hell else should we do? Pretend there isn’t interesting baseball stuff to consider? Act like we’re above having a time-worn bar argument about which player is better than another? Jeez, that would make us friggin’ communists.

Where to find the balance? I think it’s just like anything else: we should jut be suspicious of extremists. People who think the wrong guy winning is tragedy of some kind are silly. If you’re a Mike Trout guy, the world is not going to end if Miguel Cabrera wins the award and vice-versa.  At the same time, however, people who tell me that it’s not worth even engaging in the exercise are off base too.  Go not have fun someplace else, please.

Anyway, I’ve not sat down and considered any award fully. I’m seriously leaning Mike Trout for the MVP, of course, but I could theoretically have my mind changed. And if that doesn’t happen I’m not gonna consider it an atrocity if Cabrera wins.  It’s just baseball.

But dude, if a bunch of writers try to argue that base running and defense is some sort of esoteric sabermetric invention, I will take up arms and fight until either death or glory is achieved.

Wait … gotta re-read my own post again.  Damn.

Athletics acquire Ryan LaMarre from Angels

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The Athletics acquired outfielder Ryan LaMarre from the Angels for cash considerations or a player to be named later, per a team announcement on Sunday. In a corresponding move, they placed right-hander Chris Bassitt on the 60-day disabled list and assigned the outfielder to Triple-A Nashville.

LaMarre, 28, signed a one-year contract with the Angels in November, but was designated for assignment last Tuesday in order to clear roster space for veteran catcher Juan Graterol. He batted .268/.375/.341 with two extra base hits and four stolen bases through 10 games in Triple-A Salt Lake.

The outfielder has not seen a major league assignment since 2016, when he appeared in six games with the Red Sox (three times in the outfield and once on the mound) and went 0-for-5 with a walk. He’s expected to give the A’s some depth in the minors and will join Andrew Lambo, Matt McBride, Kenny Wilson and Jaycob Brugman in Nashville’s outfield.

Blue Jays place Troy Tulowitzki on 10-day disabled list with strained hamstring

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Blue Jays’ shortstop Troy Tulowitzki is headed to the 10-day disabled list, club manager John Gibbons announced on Saturday. Tulowitzki left the eighth inning of Friday’s series opener when he injured his right hamstring in an attempt to steal third. Gibbons doesn’t have a concrete timetable for the infielder’s return, but told reporters that he doesn’t anticipate a lengthy recovery period.

Tulowitzki has battled numerous injuries before, from a serious quad strain to a chip fracture in his thumb, but this appears to be the first hamstring issue that has cropped up in his 12-year career. He’s the latest casualty on Toronto’s roster, which has lost Josh Donaldson, J.A. Happ, J.P. Howell, Dalton Pompey, Aaron Sanchez, Bo Schultz and Glenn Sparkman to various injuries in the last month. No official replacement has been named yet, though MLB.com’s Austin Laymance suggests that infielder Ryan Goins is ready to step in for Tulowitzki going forward.

Prior to his injury, Tulowitzki slashed .263/.295/.386 with one home run and a .681 OPS in 16 games with the Blue Jays. He went 1-for-3 on Friday with a base hit and a walk.