Bobby Valentine goes to pinch-hitter with 2-2 count

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Bobby Valentine’s quotes and actions have gotten more erratic by the day. If he isn’t complaining about Alfredo Aceves and the rest of his “weakest roster ever,” he’s making a bizarre in-game choice, like inserting pinch-hitters mid-at-bat.

That’s what he did in the seventh inning of a scoreless game today against the Blue Jays. Valentine opted to stick with a .071-hitting Jose Iglesias with a man on first and two outs in the top of the frame. However, after Pedro Ciriaco stole second base, Valentine had a change of heart, inserting Daniel Nava into the game with a 2-2 count on the hitter.

Nava, predictably, grounded out to end the frame, and the Red Sox went on to lose 5-0.

Now, the Red Sox were 66-80 anyway. They’re certainly at the point of the season at which they should be evaluating youngsters. No, that one at-bat isn’t going to tell us much more about Iglesias than we already know (he’s not ready to hit in the majors), but if you’re going to let him start it, then you sure as hell ought to let him finish it.

Instead, Valentine chose to embarrass his young shortstop nationally. Make no mistake: he knew when he made that move that the Boston media was going to take it and run with it. No, maybe it won’t make Sportscenter, but everyone in the baseball community was going to notice it. Blown out of proportion or not, the Red Sox manager made a statement that he has no faith at all in Iglesias’ ability to hit.

At this point, it’s really a sick joke that the Red Sox haven’t fired Valentine. Everyone assumes it’s coming as soon as the season ends anyway, so why keep up the charade?

Report: MLB likely to unilaterally implement pace of play changes

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ESPN’s Jerry Crasnick reports that talks between Major League Baseball and the MLB Players’ Association concerning pace of play changes have stalled, which makes it more likely that commissioner Rob Manfred unilaterally implements the changes he seeks. Those changes include a pitch clock and a restriction on catcher mound visits.

Manfred said, “My preferred path is a negotiated agreement with the players. But if we can’t get an agreement, we are going to have rule changes in 2018, one way or the other.”

The players have made several suggestions aimed at reducing the length of games, such as amending replay review rules, strictly monitoring down time between innings, and bringing back bullpen carts.

It is believed that MLB is proposing a pitch clock of 20 seconds. If a pitcher takes too long between pitches, he will have a ball added to the count. If the hitter takes too long, then he will have a strike added to the count.