How hard did Yadier Molina throw that ball last night?

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Still going back and admiring that Yadier Molina putout last night. Just wonderful.

In the post about it I wondered how hard he threw that ball.  There have been at least two attempts at explanations so far.  The first one I saw came from commenter Ryan:

And a radar gun would be way better, but some back-of-the-envelope math suggests he threw it around 85 mph.

distance from home to 2nd base: ~127 feet; the throw was caught a little short and off of 2nd, so ~125 feet
timing with a crappy cellphone stopwatch: ~1.0 seconds from release to catch
125 feet/second = 85 mph

A lot of potential error in the timing measurement, but mid-eighties is probably about right. I wonder any catchers can throw any harder?

Then commenter dan1111 added:

It’s even more impressive when you consider that pitch speed is measured at the release point. 85 mph average over that distance is at least a low 90s fastball.

Another attempt at measuring the velocity came from Larry Granillo of Baseball Prospectus. Well, smart people he  asked about it, but he published it.  It comes in at a much lower, but still impressive speed: out of the hand at 83, averaging 72 m.p.h.  Click through to see his methodology.

Either way: damn impressive for a catcher who did not have the benefit of a mound, a fully upright position, a big stride and a windup.

Troy Tulowitzki poses as a pitcher on photo day

Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images
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Update: The photographer was apparently in on the action, according to Topps. Still pretty funny. (Hat tip: Mike Ashmore)

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Thursday marked photo day for the Blue Jays. There are always some oddities, usually when the players create fun for themselves. This time, the fun happened when a photographer mistook shortstop Troy Tulowitzki for a pitcher. Tulowitzki rolled with it and followed the photographer’s instructions to pose like a pitcher.

Hazel Mae has the hilarious video:

Hitters, of course, typically pose with a bat over their shoulder. Pitchers typically have their hand in their glove, sometimes leaning forward as if receiving the signs from their catcher.

Tulowitzki has exclusively played shortstop during his 12-year career in the majors, but perhaps one day he’ll step on the mound and be able to call himself a pitcher.