Dr. Lewis Yocum clarifies his comments on the Stephen Strasburg shutdown

10 Comments

After being quoted as saying that he “wasn’t asked” about the Stephen Strasburg shutdown, Dr. Lewis Yocum clarified his comments to the Los Angeles Times late this afternoon.

Yocum is now saying that all parties involved — including himself, Nationals general manager Mike Rizzo, Strasburg and agent Scott Boras — agreed last year that the pitcher would face an innings-limit in 2012. He also said that he has maintained dialogue with the Nationals and team doctors during the season and spoke with Rizzo recently as August 13.

“I would like to correct the misimpression generated from today’s L.A. Times article, that I have not been a participant in discussions with the Washington Nationals regarding the recovery strategy for pitcher Stephen Strasburg.  In fact, I have been contacted repeatedly and have had numerous discussions with the Nationals GM Mike Rizzo and the team’s medical personnel, as recently as mid-August.  While the final decision was up to the team, as is standard practice, I was supportive of their decision and am comfortable that my medical advice was responsibly considered.”

As Adam Kilgore of the Washington Post notes, the misunderstanding could have occurred because Yocum thought he was being asked if he helped decide precisely when Strasburg was being shut down. He wasn’t. And he said as much this time around, as well. But in the original story he was quoted as saying that he hadn’t spoken with Rizzo since last year. How could he suddenly forget that? Sure, maybe this is one big misunderstanding, but it still smells pretty fishy.

The Tigers decline Anibal Sanchez’s 2018 option

Getty Images
Leave a comment

From the “this does not surprise us in the very least” department, Tigers GM Al Avila announced today that the club is declining its $16 million option on right-hander Anibal Sanchez.

Sanchez had a terrible year in 2017, going 3-7 with a 6.41 ERA in 2017. That’s a long slide down from his 2013 season, in which he won the AL ERA title, going 14-8 and posting an ERA of 2.57 in the first year of his five-year, $80 million deal. Since then he’s gone 28-35 with a 5.15 ERA. He never started 30 games or more over the course of the contract.

The declination of the option does come with a nice parting gift for Sanchez: a $5 million buyout. Which is pretty dang high for a buyout, but that’s how the Tigers rolled three or four years ago.