Cortisone injection saved Ryan Zimmerman’s season

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Ryan Zimmerman was struggling to play through a shoulder injury and hitting just .218 with three homers and a .590 OPS in 55 games through June 23.

The next day the Nationals third baseman got a cortisone injection in his shoulder and since then he’s been on fire.

Mark Zuckerman of CSNWashington.com broke down the numbers and they’re amazing: Since the cortisone injection Zimmerman is hitting .339 with 19 homers, 21 doubles, and a 1.021 OPS in 72 games.

One of the worst hitters in baseball before the cortisone injection and one of the best hitters in baseball since the cortisone injection, which is doubly remarkable considering at the time doctors told Zimmerman that they weren’t sure how much good the shot would do on his shoulder.

Looking back on it now, here’s what Zimmerman told Zuckerman:

I’m OK with the slow starts, but not being able to swing the bat and do the things health-wise, I was worried about that. Because I know my body pretty well. Everyone in this room plays hurt. Everyone in every locker room. Nobody’s healthy. And I’ve played hurt a lot just like everyone else. But it was a different kind of feeling. It made me nervous.

That was a trying time, I guess you could say. That was about as tough a six-week stretch as I’ve ever had in my career. To be able to look up there now and know I’ve been able to battle back from that–and more importantly, can actually help the team win now–I’m pretty proud of it.

Cortisone shots for everyone!

Marlins intend to keep Christian Yelich

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With Giancarlo Stanton and Marcell Ozuna gone, the next logical step for the Marlins would be to trade away Christian Yelich. He’s be an amazingly attractive trade candidate given that he is under team control through 2022, and is owed a very reasonable $58 million or so. He just turned 26 last week and has hit .290/.369/.432 in his five year career. That’s the kind of player and contract that could bring back a mess of prospects.

Except the Marlins, it seems, don’t want to do that. Multiple reports have come out in the last hour saying that the Marlins intend to hold on to Yelich and to build around him.

That could be a negotiating ploy, of course. They’ll no doubt listen to offers and, if the right one comes along, they’d certainly give strong consideration to trading him. A good deal is a good deal.

The only question, in light of the events of the last week, is whether the Marlins would know a good deal if they saw one.