Ivan Nova in, Freddy Garcia out of Yankee rotation

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It’s back to mop-up duty for Freddy Garcia.

The Yankees’ 35-year-old right-hander, who was initially bounced from the rotation at the end of April, is returning to the pen now to make room for Ivan Nova.

Nova, who is recovering from rotator cuff inflammation, will face the Rays on Saturday. He last pitched on Aug. 21, when he gave up six runs in a loss to the White Sox.

Garcia has pitched a total of 17 2/3 innings in his last four starts, giving up 15 runs and 11 walks in the process. He’s 7-6 with a 5.19 ERA in 102 1/3 innings for the season.

The switch means that David Phelps will remain in the rotation, though perhaps only to make one more start. Phelps hadn’t been much better than Garcia of late, giving up eight runs in 8 2/3 innings in his two starts this month. Andy Pettitte’s return next week should push Phelps back to the pen.

Barring any setbacks, the Yankees will have their ducks in a row for the final two weeks of the season. Of course, thoughts about who from the group of Pettitte, Phil Hughes, Nova and Garcia might be in line for postseason starts behind CC Sabathia and Hiroki Kuroda have had to take a backseat to worrying about actually reaching the postseason.

Troy Tulowitzki poses as a pitcher on photo day

Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images
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Update: The photographer was apparently in on the action, according to Topps. Still pretty funny. (Hat tip: Mike Ashmore)

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Thursday marked photo day for the Blue Jays. There are always some oddities, usually when the players create fun for themselves. This time, the fun happened when a photographer mistook shortstop Troy Tulowitzki for a pitcher. Tulowitzki rolled with it and followed the photographer’s instructions to pose like a pitcher.

Hazel Mae has the hilarious video:

Hitters, of course, typically pose with a bat over their shoulder. Pitchers typically have their hand in their glove, sometimes leaning forward as if receiving the signs from their catcher.

Tulowitzki has exclusively played shortstop during his 12-year career in the majors, but perhaps one day he’ll step on the mound and be able to call himself a pitcher.