Adrian Beltre departs game vs. Indians with strained left shoulder, will undergo MRI

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Some potentially awful news here for the Rangers.

According to Richard Durrett of ESPN Dallas, third baseman Adrian Beltre was lifted in the fifth inning of Wednesday’s game against the Indians after feeling  discomfort in his left shoulder following a stellar defensive play at the hot corner in the second.

Beltre dove hard to his left on a sharply-stuck grounder from Cleveland batter Russ Canzler, then completed an impressive throw across the diamond to get the out. He remained in the game for the next couple frames but the discomfort only grew and he was eventually replaced by youngster Mike Olt.

Beltre is undergoing an MRI, the results of which probably won’t be available until Thursday morning.

The 33-year-old has a .318/.355/.561 batting line, 32 homers and 92 RBI in 138 games this season. His replacement, Olt, entered play Wednesday with just four hits in 37 major-league plate appearances.


UPDATE, 10:35 PM: And now Olt has left the game with an apparent foot injury, reports Durrett. Ian Kinsler is at third base and Jurickson Profar entered to play second.

Bob Uecker is basically indestructible

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Tom Haurdicourt of the Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel has a story about beloved Brewers broadcaster Bob Uecker’s frighteningly eventful offseason that’s definitely worth a read.

The frightening part: Uecker got bit by a brown recluse spider last October. He didn’t realize it at first and happened to show the bite to a doctor a couple of days later. The doctor realized how serious it was — brown recluses can kill people — and Uecker was rushed off to surgery. He’s fine now, back in the Brewers booth and actually joking about the spider bite.

The incident, though, leads Haudricourt to chronicle all of Uecker’s health issues over the years and the list is fairly amazing. I mean, we’ve written about some of his more recent health issues on this site, but I was unaware of just how many potentially fatal ailments Uecker has dealt with and beat in the past 25-30 years or so. Not that he’s too fazed by it all:

“I know I’m lucky. I’ve had 11 major surgeries overall. But, through all of that stuff, I made some unbelievable friends. All those doctors at Froedtert [Hospital]. We’re all friends now. So, a lot of good came out of it.”

That’s quite the perspective.

Uecker is 84. Counting his playing career he’s entering his 63rd year in baseball. He’s still one of the best, if not the best, broadcasters going. Thank goodness he wasn’t stopped by a spider of all things. Here’s hoping he keeps going for many more years to come.