Ryan Vogelsong is falling apart, “not really happy about it”

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Ryan Vogelsong was one of the most consistently excellent pitchers in baseball through the first four months of the season, throwing 143 innings with a league-leading 2.27 ERA through August 8 while allowing more than four runs zero times in 21 starts.

Since then he’s been a mess and after another poor outing against the Rockies last night Vogelsong has allowed 28 runs in his last 26 innings. By comparison he allowed 38 total runs in his first 143 innings.

The good news is that his 32/7 K/BB ratio during this 26-inning stretch suggests he’s still pitching much better than the ugly 9.57 ERA would suggest. The bad news is that he’s served up six homers in 125 plate appearances after giving up a grand total of 10 homers in his first 580 plate appearances.

“I’m costing us games right now and I’m not really happy about it,” Vogelsong said, via Andrew Baggarly of CSNBayArea.com. However, he added that there’s nothing wrong with him physically and “I’ve been through way too much in this game to let six not good starts keep me from where I want to get with this team.”

Baggarly also asked Buster Posey if he noticed anything different with Vogelsong, but the All-Star catcher explained that “the stuff is there, velocity is there … he’s throwing the ball as well as ever, I feel like.”

Vogelsong is scheduled to make his next start Sunday at home against the Diamondbacks, who knocked him out of the game in the fourth inning two starts ago.

Video: Troy Tulowitzki plays along with a photographer who thought he was a pitcher

Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images
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Thursday marked photo day for the Blue Jays. There are always some oddities, usually when the players create fun for themselves. This time, the fun happened when a photographer mistook shortstop Troy Tulowitzki for a pitcher. Tulowitzki rolled with it and followed the photographer’s instructions to pose like a pitcher.

Hazel Mae has the hilarious video:

Hitters, of course, typically pose with a bat over their shoulder. Pitchers typically have their hand in their glove, sometimes leaning forward as if receiving the signs from their catcher.

Tulowitzki has exclusively played shortstop during his 12-year career in the majors, but perhaps one day he’ll step on the mound and be able to call himself a pitcher.