The Nationals can’t pay for late Metro service because of … MLB policy?

41 Comments

We’ve talked before about the Nationals Metro problem. As in, the Metro is really the best way to get to Nats Park but, because it closes at midnight, it often causes fans to choose between staying for the whole game and leaving early to get the train.  And how, because of late starting playoff games, this may become a bigger problem in the future. And how, if the Nats wanted to, they could do what other teams in D.C. do and enter into a contract with WMATA to keep Metro open late on game nights at the team’s expense.

The Nats thus far have refused to do that.  We learn today, however, that the reason for this is not that they don’t want to pay. Rather, because of league policy:

OK, then. Can someone at MLB explain to me what this league policy is, why it was developed and where it has been employed before? Because I’m unaware of any other city where early-closing mass transit is an issue for ballgames. At least a problem large enough to where it has been suggested that teams pay to keep it open before.

But I do love the concern over a “precedent” being set.  What’s the precedent the league is worried about?  A baseball team, for once in its friggin’ life, having to actually pay for a service that directly benefits them and their fans as opposed to having the local government cover it?

Video: Corey Dickerson breaks scoreless tie with walk-off home run

Justin K. Aller/Getty Images
Leave a comment

Neither the Pirates nor the Tigers could manage any offense during Thursday afternoon’s game at PNC Park. That is, until outfielder Corey Dickerson launched a walk-off solo home run off of Alex Wilson with one out in the bottom of the ninth inning.

Dickerson, 28, has been solid for the Pirates for the first month of the season. He’s batting .314/.348/.500 with a pair of home runs, 13 RBI, and 13 runs scored in 92 plate appearances. The Pirates acquired him from the Rays in late February in exchange for journeyman pitcher Daniel Hudson and Single-A infielder Tristan Gray.