Remember that talk about pitcher helmets last year?

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First, an update on Brandon McCarthy, via his wife:

Jeez, Brandon. Walking right out of the gate? POUND THE ZONE!

Seriously: great news that all of the parts seem to be working properly.

Anyway, on to an article from this morning from Dustin Parkes about pitcher helmets, which reminds us that (a) technology exists that can help protect pitchers from traumatic injury via comebackers; but (b) the way people and sports work often means that such advances come slowly, albeit understandably so given the way the market works and human nature operates.

Most of us first heard about the pitcher helmets in the spring of 2011.  I wrote about it then. At the time I said that it would work an awful lot like those larger batting helmets worked a couple of years ago. And regular batting helmets before that. And every other safety measure in most walks of life: a pattern in which we begin with mockery, then move on to outrage, denial, grudging acceptance, and then finally acceptance.

Ultimately, all that will matter is if pitchers’ mechanics are the same with it and without it.  If so, players will be wearing them soon enough. If not, they’ll go on to the next thing.

UPDATE: Will Carroll talks about helmets in his latest column, just out today. He has another potential solution that may be more workable than helmets.

Danny Farquhar taken to hospital after fainting in dugout

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White Sox reliever Danny Farquhar passed out in the dugout after completing his outing against the Astros on Friday evening. The cause of the incident has yet to be determined, but Farquhar was supervised by the club’s medical personnel and EMTs and regained consciousness before being taken to Rush University Medical Center for further treatment and testing. A diagnosis has not been announced by the team.

Farquhar pitched 2/3 of an inning in relief during Friday’s 10-0 loss to Houston. He was brought in to relieve James Shields in the top of the sixth inning and was immediately bested by George Springer, who belted a ground-rule double down the right field line and scored Brian McCann and Derek Fisher for the Astros’ sixth and seventh runs of the night. He recovered to strike out Jose Altuve, but was again punished with a two-run homer from Carlos Correa (his first of two), and induced a fly out to end the inning.

The 31-year-old righty pitched just 7 1/3 innings with the club prior to Friday’s performance, issuing four hits, three runs, two homers and eight strikeouts in seven appearances.