Remember that talk about pitcher helmets last year?

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First, an update on Brandon McCarthy, via his wife:

Jeez, Brandon. Walking right out of the gate? POUND THE ZONE!

Seriously: great news that all of the parts seem to be working properly.

Anyway, on to an article from this morning from Dustin Parkes about pitcher helmets, which reminds us that (a) technology exists that can help protect pitchers from traumatic injury via comebackers; but (b) the way people and sports work often means that such advances come slowly, albeit understandably so given the way the market works and human nature operates.

Most of us first heard about the pitcher helmets in the spring of 2011.  I wrote about it then. At the time I said that it would work an awful lot like those larger batting helmets worked a couple of years ago. And regular batting helmets before that. And every other safety measure in most walks of life: a pattern in which we begin with mockery, then move on to outrage, denial, grudging acceptance, and then finally acceptance.

Ultimately, all that will matter is if pitchers’ mechanics are the same with it and without it.  If so, players will be wearing them soon enough. If not, they’ll go on to the next thing.

UPDATE: Will Carroll talks about helmets in his latest column, just out today. He has another potential solution that may be more workable than helmets.

Ryon Healy exits game after taking a ground ball to the face

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Athletics’ first baseman Ryon Healy had a scary moment during Friday’s loss to the Mets. Lucas Duda smacked a single to the first base side, where the ball took a high hop and caught Healy in the left temple. He crumpled to the ground after getting struck by the one-hopper, but was eventually able to stand and walk off the field with assistance from a trainer.

Prior to the injury, Healy went 2-for-3 at the plate with an RBI single in the first inning. He was replaced by Yonder Alonso, who finished off the rest of the night’s 7-5 loss with a walk in two plate appearances.

Following the game, manager Bob Melvin told reporters that Healy did not appear to have sustained a concussion as a result of the hit. Healy said he thinks he’ll be good to go for Saturday’s game, though a final decision likely won’t be made until tomorrow.

Report: White Sox acquire Mark Lowe and Jean Machi from Mariners

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Tacoma Rainiers’ broadcaster Mike Curto reports that the White Sox have acquired veteran right-handed relievers Mark Lowe and Jean Machi from the Mariners in exchange for cash considerations. Neither team has officially confirmed the deal yet.

Lowe, 34, signed a minor league deal with the Mariners in late March. He pitched to a 6.23 ERA in Triple-A Tacoma and tacked on a 4.6 BB/9 and 8.5 SO/9 through 39 innings. He last appeared in the majors with the Tigers, and finished his run in 2016 with a 7.11 ERA through 49 1/3 innings before getting released by the club prior to the 2017 season.

Machi, 35, struggled to find a place in the Mariners’ bullpen this season. A nerve issue in his thumb derailed his efforts at the start of 2017, and he was outrighted to Triple-A after pitching to a 1.17 ERA through 7 2/3 innings in Seattle. In Tacoma, the right-hander’s numbers weren’t too shabby: he split his efforts between the rotation and bullpen and worked a collective 3.44 ERA, 2.0 BB/9 and 7.1 SO/9 through 36 2/3 innings.

Lowe and Machi will help flesh out a White Sox bullpen that has been depleted by recent injuries and trades. They’re expected to report to Chicago’s Triple-A affiliate in Charlotte and could see time in the big leagues by the end of the season.