J.A. Happ done for season with foot injury

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The Blue Jays haven’t been able to catch a break with their pitching staff this season, so it makes perfect sense that J.A. Happ is done for the year with an injury to his right foot.

According to Ken Fidlin of the Toronto Sun, Blue Jays manager John Farrell said a fracture was found in the foot after he felt lingering discomfort in his ankle following a play at first base on August 29 against the Yankees.

“We’re not quite sure where it started,” manager John Farrell said. “The play at first base irritated his ankle where he was feeling discomfort at the time. When the discomfort lingered, we had an MRI done and it showed a fracture in the foot. The recommendation is to have surgery and his season is over.”

Happ, who was acquired from the Astros in July in a 10-player trade, posted a 4.69 ERA and 46/17 K/BB ratio in 40 1/3 innings over six starts and four relief appearances with Toronto. The 29-year-old southpaw is the eighth Blue Jays pitcher to go down with a season-ending injury this year, joining Robert Coello, Kyle Drabek, Drew Hutchison, Jesse Litsch, Dustin McGowan, Luis Perez and Sergio Santos.

Must-read: A profile on former Rays prospect Brandon Martin, currently in jail for alleged murders of three men

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Nathan Fenno of the Los Angeles Times has an outstanding profile of former Rays prospect Brandon Martin, who is currently in jail for allegedly murdering three men nearly two years ago.

Fenno describes Martin’s erratic personality as he became a highly-touted baseball prospect who then descends into drug use. Friends described Martin has having completely changed into an unrecognizable person. Martin had repeated conflicts with friends and family such that police reports became common and he was placed in a psychiatric facility. Sadly, the facility only held him for less than 48 hours. He would allegedly murder three people upon returning home: his father, his brother-in-law, and a home security system contractor. Martin fled from police, who eventually caught up to him and subdued him with the help of a police dog.

Fenno’s profile is really worth a read, so click here to check it out.

Martin, 23, was selected by the Rays in the first round (38th overall) of the 2011 draft. He spent three years in the Rays’ system, reaching as high as Single-A Bowling Green.

Pedro Martinez: “If I was pitching, I was going to drill Machado, as much as I love him.”

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On Sunday, Red Sox reliever Matt Barnes was ejected for throwing at Orioles third baseman Manny Machado‘s head. It was revenge for a slide of Machado’s which ended up injuring Red Sox second baseman Dustin Pedroia. Barnes was suspended four games.

Hall of Famer and former Red Sox pitcher Pedro Martinez said that if he were in Barnes’ shoes, he would have also thrown at Machado, although not necessarily at his head. Via ESPN’s Scott Lauber:

If I was pitching, I was going to drill Machado, as much as I love him. The only thing I would’ve done differently is probably bring the ball a little bit lower.

Martinez added that Machado “did not intend to hurt Pedroia. And I know that because I know Machado.” And he doesn’t think Barnes meant to throw at Machado’s head.

Martinez, of course, was certainly a pitcher who wasn’t afraid to pitch inside to batters and even hit a few of them when he felt he or his teammates had been wronged. This is an unfortunate part of baseball’s culture and the fact that it continues means that it will eventually result in someone being seriously hurt. It’s disappointing that Martinez isn’t willing to be a better role model now that his playing days are over. Martinez could have set an example for today’s pitchers by saying what Barnes did crossed a line. Getting a Hall of Famer’s seal of approval will only embolden players now when they feel they must defend their teammates’ honor.

The “tradition” of beaning batters to defend one’s teammates is anachronistic in today’s game, especially when Major League Baseball has made strides in so many other ways recently to protect players’ safety.