Nick Punto brings his jersey shredding to Los Angeles

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I vaguely remember hearing about Nick Punto literally tearing off his teammates’ jerseys as some sort of walkoff win ceremony when he was in Boston earlier this year, but I chalked it up to spicy food before midnight or something.  Now that I’m reading about it happening in L.A., however, I guess it’s a real thing:

Of the $262.5 million that Adrian Gonzalez, Josh Beckett, Carl Crawford and Punto are owed after this season, Punto accounts for just $1.5 million of that total. His value to a team searching for chemistry, however, cannot be understated, especially during walk-off wins.

When Punto’s team wins in walk-off fashion, he reverts into his “Shredder” alter ego. He runs from the dugout like a sprinter out of the starter blocks, makes a beeline to whoever had the winning hit and proceeds to tear the player’s jersey off while the rest of his teammates jump into the fray.

He did it in St. Louis too:

“Last year, David Freese’s Game 6 jersey is in the Hall of Fame,” Punto said. “But it’s torn up in pieces.”

And now he’s done that the past couple of nights as the Dodgers have two walkoff wins in a row. AJ. Ellis was the most recent victim.

It’s like Punto sat around for two years trying to think of something dumber than hitting a teammate in the face with a pie or coming up with some silly hand gesture and then said “screw it, I’m just gonna assault my teammate.”  The only place we have to go from here are “Victory Face Punches” and “Rally Cup Checks.”

Mets invite Tim Tebow to spring training

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Tim Tebow isn’t letting go of his major league dreams just yet. The former NFL quarterback is slated to appear with the Mets during spring training this year, extending what initially looked like an ill-fated career choice for at least one more season. Per the club’s official announcement on Friday, he’ll join a group of spring training invitees that includes top-30 prospects like Peter Alonso, P.J. Conlon, Patrick Mazeika and David Thompson.

Tebow, 30, hasn’t taken to professional baseball as gracefully as expected. He batted a cumulative .226/.309/.347 with eight home runs and a .656 OPS in 486 plate appearances for Single-A Columbia and High-A St. Lucie in 2017. While that wasn’t enough to compel the Mets to give the aging outfielder a big league tryout, there’s no denying that Tebow brought substantial benefit to their minor league affiliates — in the form of increased attendance figures and ticket sales, that is.

Even after the Mets were booted from the NL East race last September, they resisted the idea of promoting Tebow for a late-season attendance boost of their own. That’s not to say they’re planning on taking the same approach in 2018; Tebow will undoubtedly get his cup of coffee in the majors at some point, but for now, a Grapefruit League tryout is likely as close as he’ll ever get to playing with the team’s big league roster on an everyday basis.