The Astros name Kevin Goldstein pro scouting coordinator

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It’s official: the Astros have named Baseball Prospects’ Kevin Goldstein their Coordinator of Pro Scouting.

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Earlier this year the Houston Astros were interested in hiring ESPN writer Keith Law for their front office.  Then they hired Mike Fast from Baseball Prospectus.  In the Jeff Lunhow front office, it seems, writers are the new inefficiency, because Jon Heyman reports thusly:

Months after Luhnow tried to lure Keith Law from ESPN and hired Mike Fast from Baseball Prospectus, the new name being heard is Kevin Goldstein, also from Baseball Prospectus. (Luhnow called Goldstein “very well thought-of” while declining to say whether he’s joining the Astros; Goldstein, known for extensive prospect reviews and clever, sometimes sassy tweets, responded “no comment” via a direct message on Twitter.)

“We want people who are going to share our vision,” Luhnow said. “It doesn’t necessarily need to be a traditional-looking person. We’re going to be open-minded.”

Kevin Goldstein: Clever. Sometimes sassy. Not traditional-looking. I love Kevin, so I could mock him all day!

Seriously, though, hats off (but not Kevin’s, because he ALWAYS wears it) to the Astros for being creative and open-minded in their hiring.  When you hit bottom, as the Astros have competitively speaking, there is zero percentage in playing it safe or traditional.

The Angels were the first team to use up all of their mound visits

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Last night’s Angels-Astros game was a long affair with a bunch of homers and the use of 11 pitchers in all. The Angels used six pitchers and all of that business led to plenty of conferences. Six, in fact, which is their allotment under the new rule capping mound visits. As far as I can tell, that makes the Angels the first team to use up all of their mound visits since the advent of the rule.

Sadly, they did not try to go for a seventh, thereby testing the currently unknown limits of the rule. Umpires have been instructed to not allow additional mound visits, but they cannot issue balls or tackle anyone or anything to enforce it. Presumably, if Maldonado had walked out to talk to Cam Bedrosian about the weather or where he was going to dinner after the game, the home plate umpire would’ve simply done the old Robin Williams English policeman’s bit of yelling “Stop! . . . or I shall yell ‘Stop!’ again!” Maybe a fine would issue later, but we’ll never know.

At least until someone breaks the limit. And we know someone will, right? We should have a betting pool on who does it.