The song you’re gonna get tired of this postseason: Springsteen’s “Land of Hope and Dreams”

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Each fall Major League Baseball and its broadcast partners put together a pretty elaborate music video/promo thingy for the postseason. The song and its underlying theme are used for commercial bumpers and intros and become ubiquitous — often annoyingly so — to anyone who sits and watches the playoffs every night.

But if we’re gonna get tired of a playoff promo song, at least this year baseball has made a massive improvement over “Written in the Stars.” It’s The Boss, “Land of Hope and Dreams.”

Like most repurposed-Springsteen, it’s best to not get too hung up on the fact that the song is rooted in the crumbling and elusive American Dream and, instead, just groove on the uplift. You know, like “Born in the USA” at a political rally. Or “State Trooper” at a FOP banquet.

Enjoy:

 

 

Autopsy report reveals morphine, Ambien in Roy Halladay’s system

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Traces of morphine, amphetamine, Prozac and Ambien were found in Roy Halladay’s system at the time of his death, according to the autopsy findings Zachary T. Sampson of the Tampa Bay Times reported Friday. The former Phillies and Blue Jays ace and two-time Cy Young Award winner was killed in a plane crash off the Gulf of Mexico last November. While the exact cause of the incident has not yet been determined, it was a combination of blunt force trauma and drowning that resulted in the 40-year-old’s death.

Further details from the NY Daily News revealed that Halladay sustained a fractured leg and a “subdural hemorrhage, multiple rib fractures, and lung, liver and spleen injuries” during the crash. As for the drugs present in his system, the autopsy report suggests that the presence of morphine could be linked to heroin use, though there’s no clear evidence that he did so.

The toxicology results also determined that Halladay had a blood-alcohol content level of 0.01. A BAC of 0.08 is the legal limit for operating a car, but current FAA regulations prohibit any alcohol consumption for eight hours before operating aircraft. Halladay was both the pilot and sole passenger aboard the plane when it crashed.

Previous statements from the National Transportation Safety Board indicate that the investigation is still ongoing and could take up to two years to resolve.