melky getty

MLB investigating links between Melky’s agents and steroid dealer Kirk Radomski

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This is interesting. Bob Nightengale of USA Today reports:

Major League Baseball is investigating whether four-time All-Star catcher Paul Lo Duca’s relationship with steroid distributor Kirk Radomski was arranged by his former agents, three people with knowledge of the investigation told USA TODAY Sports. They spoke Tuesday on condition of anonymity due to the sensitive nature of the investigation.

And it’s not just old news simply because it involves an old player like Lo Duca. Because the agents in question — Seth and Sam Levinson — are also Melky Cabrera’s agents. And the information about the Lo Duca-Radomski relationship has arisen in the context of MLB’s investigation into the Melky Cabrera fake website craziness.

Nightengale lays out the relationship between Lo Duca, Radomski and the Levinsons. Some of this was in the Mitchell Report — we know Lo Duca was a total genius and wrote personal checks to Radomski for his HGH — but Nightengale reports that the checking account was in both Lo Duca’s and the Levinsons’ names.  That’s news. The Levinsons strongly deny any relationship to Radomski or any involvement in procuring PEDs for their clients, Lo Duca and Melky Cabrera included.

Obviously it’s too early to tell what this may mean. But it certainly puts that whole Melky website thing in a new light. Remember, the guy who created it worked for the Levinsons. He claimed to be a lone gunman, but one wonders if Major League Baseball isn’t playing Jim Garrison here and looking to see if there were any agents on the grassy knoll.

If so: bye-bye agents livelihood, as they will be drummed out of the player representation business permanently, one assumes.

Coco Crisp traded to the Indians for a minor league reliever

SAN FRANCISCO, CA - JUNE 27:  Coco Crisp #4 of the Oakland Athletics rounds third base to score against the San Francisco Giants in the top of the seventh inning at AT&T Park on June 27, 2016 in San Francisco, California.  (Photo by Thearon W. Henderson/Getty Images)
Thearon W. Henderson/Getty Images
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UPDATE: (11:36 AM EDT, Wednesday): The deal has been announced by both clubs. The A’s will be receiving left-handed pitcher Colt Hynes. Hynes is 31. He’s pitches seven games in the big leagues and has spent ten years in the minors with a 3.62 ERA in 456 games, almost all in relief.

Update (7:49 AM EDT, Wednesday): Susan Slusser hears word that, yes, the deal is official.

Update (7:20 PM EDT): John Hickey of the Bay Area News Group reports that Crisp has indeed been traded, but there won’t be an official announcement until Wednesday. Crisp has already left the Athletics’ clubhouse.

*

Steve Adams of MLB Trade Rumors is reporting that the Athletics and Indians are making progress on a trade that would send outfielder Coco Crisp to Cleveland. Jon Morosi of FOX Sports confirms Adams’ report. Crisp, who has 10-and-5 rights, has waived them in order to facilitate a deal.

Crisp, 36, is owed the remainder of his $11 million salary for the 2016 season and has a $13 million option for the 2017 season that vests if he reaches 550 plate appearances or plays in 130 games this season. He has already played in 102 games and logged 434 PA, batting .234/.299/.399 with 11 home runs and 47 RBI.

The Indians are still looking to bolster the outfield. Michael Brantley is expected to miss the rest of the season, Bradley Zimmer may not yet be ready for the majors, and Abraham Almonte is not eligible to play in the postseason after testing positive for boldenone in February.

Wow! Zach McAllister kicks a line drive into the air, catches it

Screen Shot 2016-08-31 at 10.58.31 AM
MLB.com
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I met some guy on a hike a couple of months ago who used to be married to a close friend or a cousin or something of Indians pitcher Zach McAllister. I forget the details but it was some tenuous relationship like that. No different than a lot of brush-with-fame stories you get from Triple-A towns like Columbus, where McAllister spent some time.

Anyway, the guy met McAllister a couple of times. They didn’t really talk about much but the guy said he remembers McAllister talking about just how hard baseball was. In terms of the skills required and the mastery of it even if you are blessed with those skills. And, of course, the mental strain of it all when you’re at that place, as McAllister was at the time, when your career can either be made or broken by what the big club thinks of you. He was 22 or 23 then, and if he hadn’t been called up soon, he might’ve gone from prospect to organizational guy and that’s a lot of money left on the table.

Anyway, the point of it all was that this guy I was hiking with — not a big baseball fan — was super impressed with McAllister and said he hadn’t thought about just how hard professional sports were to even the guys who are insanely gifted at playing professional sports. I don’t think most of us think about that as much as we probably should.

Then again, sometimes players make it look easy. Like McAllister did last night when he threw a pitch to Kurt Suzuki, kicked the line drive that was hit back to him into the air and caught it on the fly: