Joe Mauer high five

Joe Mauer is on waivers and someone should claim him


Jon Heyman of CBS Sports is reporting that Mauer cleared waivers this afternoon.


Joe Mauer, like so many other stars this month, is on the waiver wire, having been placed on revocable waivers by the Twins. Odds are that he’ll go unclaimed, and even if he doesn’t, it’s highly, highly unlikely that he’ll be traded. For one thing, he has a no-trade clause. For another, it doesn’t sound like the Twins have any real desire to move him.

If, however, a team could get Mauer for free, I’d be in favor of the move. Mauer’s contract is still a risky proposition going forward, but the concerns about it have always been overblown. One thing that makes it more attractive: it’s not backloaded. While most stars get increased salaries as the contracts go along, Mauer is earning exactly $23 million in each of the eight years of his contract, which runs through 2018.

Of course, Mauer has been quiet in the power department since his MVP campaign in 2009. Target Field has a lot to do with that, though. This year, he has five homers and 15 doubles in 58 games on the road, compared to three homers and 11 doubles in 62 games at home. Put him in an environment in which hitting long flyballs would do him more good, and I imagine that Mauer would hit more long flyballs. One of the game’s most talented hitters, he’s definitely capable of suiting his approach to his ballpark.

There is the injury risk, but Mauer appears well on his way to playing in 135 games for the fourth time in five years. Used primarily as a catcher, his all-around game makes him worth his salary even if he’s not a 20-homer guy. If his knees do force him off the position during the back half of his deal, then $23 million per year might be excessive. I still think he’d be at least a $15 million-$20 million player as a first baseman or third baseman, though.

We’ve already heard from CBS Sports’ Jon Heyman that the Red Sox won’t claim Mauer, so that probably means that nobody will. He’s almost certainly still be a Twin come Opening Day. The Red Sox, though, could do a lot worse. Mauer isn’t Adrian Gonzalez, but he’d be a stellar alternative as a No. 3 hitter.

Joe Girardi is not a fan of Game 162 scheduling

Joe Girardi
Getty Images

The Yankees fell behind early to the Orioles on Sunday afternoon, a day after dropping both ends of Saturday’s doubleheader. Their game, as did every other game on Sunday with the exception of the Braves-Cardinals doubleheader, started at 3:05 or 3:10 EDT, a change Major League Baseball recently made to create fairness on the final day of the season.

Girardi is not a fan. Per the Associated Press:

It was cloudy at Camden Yards at 3:05 p.m., but late-afternoon games often make it difficult for batters to see pitches.

Girardi said, “Here’s the thing that bothers me: If it’s a sunny day you’re playing in shadows.”

He added, “If it’s the most important game of the year to get in, I don’t think that’s right.”

Understanding the idea is for every team to play at the same time, Girardi said, “Then play all night games.”

One wonders if MLB had scheduled Sunday’s slate of games for the night, if Girardi would have instead complained about batters losing fly balls in the stadium lights. Furthermore, both teams have to play in the same conditions.

Video: Ichiro Suzuki pitches an inning for the Marlins

Ichiro Suzuki
AP Photo

Marlins outfielder Ichiro Suzuki was given an opportunity to play a new position in Sunday’s series finale against the Phillies. After the Phillies rallied to take a 6-2 lead in the seventh, the Marlins let Suzuki take the hill in the eighth. And, in news that surprises no one, he was impressive.

Though Suzuki gave up a run on two hits, he flashed a fastball that hit the mid-80’s and a breaking ball with some bite.

Suzuki, who turns 42 years old later this month, is 65 hits of 3,000 in his major league career. The Marlins are interested in bringing him back in 2016.