Must-Click Link: the subtle racial bias of baseball broadcasters

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We’ve talked casually for years about how white athletes are described in different terms than black or Latino athletes. The whites are smart, gritty and hard-working, the blacks are naturally gifted or are described in terms of raw athleticism and the Latinos are dumb or lazy. You’ve heard this kind of noise before. We all have, even if it’s extremely rare for so fine a point to be put on it.

It’s a subject worthy of more rigorous observation, so recently Seth Amitin of IGN.com and Dingersblog.com researched the topic. The results, in depth (though there is a longer version I’ll have my hands on soon) are published over at The Atlantic today:

Are sports announcers guilty of this sort of bias, and are viewers unknowingly absorbing them?

To answer this question we dispatched a group of ten people to combine to watch every single television broadcast of a Major League Baseball game for a week last season—95 games total, and nearly 200 separate broadcasts, since nearly every team fields its own broadcast for every game. We analyzed these games for the words announcers used to describe players, with the goal of finding out whether broadcasters spoke about white players and players of color differently.

Definitely worth a read. Indeed, if you’re white, the only excuse not to read it is that you’re suffering from a nagging injury that we all know you’d play through if you could. If not, it’s because you’re a lazy clubhouse cancer squandering your talents.

Phillies, Jake Arrieta having a “dialogue”

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No, not like a Socratic dialogue, in which each side, in a mostly cooperative, but intellectually confrontational manner interrogate one another as a means of testing assertions and finding truths, though that would be an AMAZING thing for baseball players and teams to do. Rather, low-level talks about possible interest in Jake Arrieta, baseball free agent.

Arrieta is probably the top free agent still available, now that Yu Darvish, J.D. Martinez and Eric Hosmer have signed. Philly has money — it’s a big market — and could use a pitcher, but Jon Heyman, who, much like Plato did for Socrates, reported the dialogue, says they’re not looking to go long term with anyone.

It may make sense for Arrieta to take a so-called “pillow contract” and come back on the market in a year, but if he’s willing to accept a one-year deal, there are a lot of teams other than Philly who may offer one, and you’d have to figure Arrieta would prefer to pitch for a team more likely to contend.

Dialogues are cool, though. You should go have one over lunch.