Jayson Werth and Davey Johnson dump on Jim Riggleman

19 Comments

Bill Ladson of MLB.com has a story up about how the Nationals have a new offensive identity this year. The crux of it: Davey Johnson — unlike seemingly every broadcaster you’ve ever heard — is NOT a fan of his hitters always trying to take the ball the other way. Rather, he wants his hitters to pull the ball if they get busted inside rather than seek out those “good piece of hitting” pats on the head.

But in saying so, he quite clearly criticized his predecessor, Jim Riggleman, for emphasizing that approach, noting that it’s not his philosophy, nor is it the philosophy of Rick Eckstein, the hitting coach under both of them:

 “I think the regime before liked everybody to go the other way. We really couldn’t handle fastballs [inside]. We didn’t hit the ball where it was pitched. We have the talent to hit the ball where it was pitched, but we were a little defensive. … We had the book on us. … ‘Pound them in with hard stuff,’ and we weren’t able to do much.”

If it’s a bit unusual for a manager to directly reference “the regime before” in such matters, it’s extremely uncommon for a player to slag on his last manager by name like Jayson Werth does later in the article:

“Between last year and this year, it’s night and day,” Werth said. “Just the whole atmosphere in the clubhouse. You have an iconic manager that really knows how to handle this team. If we still had a guy like Riggleman as the manager, I don’t think the team is where it’s at.”

Wow.

Of course, players have been super positive things about Davey Johnson for his whole career and the results speak for themselves, yet he has been run out of town a number of times. It’s almost as if he sometimes has run-ins with the front office or something.

Danny Farquhar in critical condition after suffering ruptured aneurysm

Danny Farquhar
AP Images
2 Comments

Awful news for the White Sox and reliever Danny Farquhar: the right-hander remains hospitalized with a brain hemorrhage, per a team announcement on Saturday. He’s in stable but critical condition after sustaining a “ruptured aneurysm [that] caused the brain bleed” on Friday.

Farquhar, 31, passed out in the dugout during the sixth inning of Friday’s game against the Astros. He regained consciousness shortly after the incident and was taken to RUSH University Medical Center, where he’s expected to continue treatment with Dr. Demetrius Lopez in the neurological ICU unit.

“It takes your breath away a little bit,” club manager Rick Renteria said following the game. “One of your guys is down there and you have no idea what’s going on. […] When one of your teammates or anybody you know has an episode, even if it’s not a teammate, something is going on, you realize everything else you keep in perspective. Everything has its place. It’s one of our guys, so we are glad he was conscious when he left here.”