Adrian Gonzalez on why the Boston media didn’t like him

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Adrian Gonzalez is really, really happy to be back in California. And he’s comfortable enough there to throw some bombs back in Boston’s direction. Dylan Hernandez of the L.A. Times reports:

As for why the Boston media didn’t take to him, he said, “They didn’t like that I was a calm person. I won’t throw my helmet, I won’t scream, I won’t use bad words if I strike out. That’s what they want over there … They took me over there and I didn’t change. My intensity, how I prepared, everything was the same. When they took me over there, they took me over there to drive in runs. And I did that.”

I’ll agree that the Boston media prefers it when guys are more interesting, but unless I missed something I never sensed that anyone had it in for Gonzalez especially. He caught heat, understandably so, with that whole Kelly Shoppach/text message fiasco. When he had a poor first half of this season it was noted. But it’s not like he had people down on him like Beckett or Crawford or Buchholz or anyone.

It was obviously not a good fit for him, both culturally and competitively — Hernandez notes how the Green Monster hurt Gonzalez instead of helped him like many thought it would — but there are guys who have gotten a way harder time thrown their way in Boston than Gonzalez.  Indeed, if it wasn’t for the opportunity to dump Beckett and Crawford in this deal, it seems like Boston may very well have wanted to keep him around.

Rockies acquire Zac Rosscup from Cubs

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The Rockies announced a minor swap of relief pitchers on Monday evening. The Cubs sent lefty Zac Rosscup to the Rockies in exchange for right-hander Matt Carasiti.

Rosscup, 29, was designated for assignment by the Cubs last Thursday. He spent only two-thirds of an inning in the majors this year and has a 5.32 career ERA across 47 1/3 innings. Rosscup has spent most of the season with Triple-A Iowa, posting a 2.60 ERA in 27 2/3 innings.

Carasiti, 25, spent 15 2/3 innings in the majors last year, putting up an ugly 9.19 ERA. With Triple-A Albuquerque this season, he compiled a 2.37 ERA and a 43/13 K/BB ratio in 30 1/3 innings.

U.S. Court of Appeals affirms ruling that the minor leagues are exempt from federal antitrust law

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The Associated Press reported that on Monday, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit affirmed a district court ruling which holds that the minor leagues are exempt from federal antitrust law, just like the major leagues.

In 2015, four minor leaguers sued Major League Baseball, alleging that MLB violated antitrust laws with its hiring and employment policies. They accused MLB of “restrain[ing] horizontal competition between and among” franchises and “artificially and illegally depressing” the salaries of minor league players.

The U.S. Court of Appeals said the players failed to state an antitrust claim, as the Curt Flood Act of 1998 exempted Minor League Baseball explicitly from antitrust laws.

This case is separate from the Aaron Senne case in which Major League Baseball is accused of violating the Fair Labor Standards Act. That case was recertified as a class action lawsuit in March. In December, Major League Baseball established a political action committee (PAC), which came months after two members of Congress sought to change language in the FLSA so that minor league players could continue to be paid substandard wages.