Dodgers set to get Gonzalez, Crawford and Beckett from Red Sox

102 Comments

8:23 a.m. EDT update: Ken Rosenthal of FOXSports.com reports that the deal is “pretty much done.” Beckett and Crawford have waived their no-trade rights and both teams have signed off on medicals, so we’re presumably waiting on approval from the commissioner’s office.

6:40 a.m. EDT update: According to Gordon Edes of ESPNBoston.com, the blockbuster deal will be made official Saturday.

2:10 a.m. EDT update: Jon Heyman reports that Crawford has approved the trade. All that stands in the way now is Beckett waiving his no-trade clause and league approval. Expectations are that it will be finalized.

Here’s a breakdown of all of the pieces involved.

11:05 p.m. EDT update: According to Jon Heyman of CBS Sports, the Dodgers are one of just three teams on Crawford’s no-trade list. He’s yet to be asked whether he’d approve the deal, though many have suggested he’d welcome the move.

10:40 p.m. EDT update: The Boston Herald’s Michael Silverman reports that the Dodgers would absorb more than 95 percent of the combined $271.5 million in salaries the Red Sox are sending their way. If that’s true, the Red Sox would eat no more than $13.5 million.

8:00 p.m. EDT update: FOXSports.com’s Jon Morosi reports that the Dodgers have agreed to send RHP Rubby De La Rosa, RHP Allen Webster, 1B/OF Jerry Sands, INF Ivan De Jesus and 1B James Loney to the Red Sox for 1B Adrian Gonzalez, OF Carl Crawford, RHP Josh Beckett and INF Nick Punto. Nothing is expected to be finalized tonight.

7:42 p.m. EDT update: A source told CSNNE.com’s Sean McAdam hat the Red Sox have yet to secure trade permission from either Josh Beckett or Carl Crawford, but he adds that neither is expected to block a deal. Adrian Gonzalez lacks any sort of trade protection in his contract.

FOXSports.com’s Jon Morosi is reporting that top Dodgers prospect Allen Webster is also involved, which would seem to suggest the Red Sox are throwing quite a bit of cash into the trade.

WEEI’s Rob Bradford reports that an announcement of the trade is unlikely to come tonight.

7:03 p.m. EDT update: Adrian Gonzalez was scratched. too.

6:58 p.m. EDT update: The Dodgers just scratched James Loney from Friday’s starting lineup. It looks like this is getting done.

6:50 p.m. EDT update: Yahoo! Sports’ Jeff Passan says the Red Sox and Dodgers have the framework in place and believes that something is going get done. The Boston Globe’s Peter Abraham says the sides have two possibilities in play, the likely nine- or 10-player trade that includes Adrian Gonzalez, Carl Crawford and Josh Beckett, as well as a somewhat smaller trade that excludes Crawford.

The Dodgers sent rumored key component Ruddy De La Rosa back to Triple-A today, a move that would facilitate a deal. De La Rosa didn’t clear waivers, so he can’t be traded as is. However, now that he’s back in the minors, he can be included as a PTBN (a player to be named) and then get sent to Boston once the season is over.

5:58 p.m. EDT update: Speaking on WGAM with Matt Perrault, ESPN Boston’s Gordon Edes said he believes the Red Sox would get back RHP Rubby De La Rosa, INF Ivan De Jesus, 1B/OF Jerry Sands and 1B James Loney in return for Gonzalez, Crawford, Beckett and Punto.

Loney is probably just in there for salary purposes, not as someone the Red Sox would be looking at as a 2013 first baseman. De La Rosa is the legitimate prospect, a possible No. 2 or No. 3 starter as soon as next year. De Jesus is a utilityman, while Sands would be worth an audition as a first base or left field option.

5:50 p.m. EDT update: A source told FOXSports.com’s Jon Morosi that a deal is close, with Adrian Gonzalez, Carl Crawford, Josh Beckett and Nick Punto all involved.

Morosi says the Red Sox would seen some cash to the Dodgers in the trade.

///

Wow!

Gonzalez, Beckett and Crawford!  That’s around $300 million in players who aren’t as good as the Red Sox needed them to be on the verge of being shoved out the door.  No idea what the return could be. Rubby De La Rosa is the Dodgers top prospect, but some have said he’s untouchable.  I guess we’ll find out.

Bryce Harper is really just a tiny bit better Adam Lind when you think about it

Associated Press
8 Comments

Tom Boswell of the Washington Post writes about an important matter facing the Washington Nationals over the next year: what to do about Bryce Harper, who is entering his walk year and will be a free agent a little over 12 months from now.

That’s a fine and important question. The Nats do need to decide whether to offer Harper a long term deal, when to offer it and, above all else, how big that deal should be. Should it be $300 million? $400 million? Should it be conventional or unconventional, with opt-outs and such? It’s not every day that a generational talent comes along and it’s even more rare that the generational talent hits free agency at the age of 26, so the decisions facing the Nationals are not easy ones.

Boswell acknowledges that bit of trickiness, but he also, strangely, spends a whole lot of time trying to portray Harper as an ordinary talent. He starts with health, comparing him poorly with Stephen Strasburg, who is ranked 30th in games started over the past five years. In contrast . . .

In those same five years, Harper ranks 90th in games played, just 126 a season, and now he says he should have skipped quite a few more games in 2016 when he had a balky shoulder. That’s almost six weeks out per season.

Nowhere in the column is it mentioned that the several weeks he missed in 2017 was the result of a freak injury in wet conditions and that, despite that, Harper worked his tail off to come back and be ready for the postseason. Not that Boswell doesn’t mention the postseason of course . . .

Harper, for the fourth time, failed to lead his team out of the first round and has career playoff batting average and OPS marks of .215 and .801. By the high standards of right fielders, he’s Mr. Average in October.

I suppose it’s not Boswell’s job to refrain from insulting a player on the team he covers, but he certainly seems hellbent on insulting not only Harper, but our own intelligence via comparisons like this:

In the past five years, in those 126 games, Harper averaged 26 homers, 72 RBI and a .288 average. Over the last nine years, Adam Lind averaged 128 games, 20 homers, 70 RBI and hit .273. That’s selective stat mining. Harper is much better, in part because he walks so much. But Harper and Lind in the same sentence?

“A person can eat delicious chocolate cake or lead paint chips. The chocolate cake is much better, but chocolate cake and lead paint in the same sentence?” I guess Boswell gets points for acknowledging that it was a misleading comparison, but if he thinks it is, why make it in the first place? If you want to eliminate this one as an outlier, cool, because he makes a lot of other comparisons like that in the piece.

This is not necessarily new for Boswell. Here’s something he wrote about Harper in 2014:

Harper has not driven in 60 runs in either of his two seasons. He has only five RBI this year. He’s never had more than 157 runs-plus-RBI. Ryan Zimmerman has had between 163 and 216 six times. Adam LaRoche, no big star, has had 175 or more three times. Fourth outfielder Nate McLouth once had 207. Can we get a grip? Counting their three top starting pitchers, Harper may be the Nats’ seventh-best player. If forced to choose whether Harper or Anthony Rendon would have the better career, I’d think twice. Harper is in a self-conscious, fierce scowl-off with baseball. Rendon dances with it and grins. Baseball loves relaxed.

That was written 16 games into his age-22 season.

I’m not sure what Boswell’s beef with Harper is. I’m not sure why he’s contorting himself to portray him as an ordinary player when he is fairly extraordinary and, most certainly, a special case when it comes to his impending free agency. In his career he already has 26.1 career bWAR, 150 homers, an MVP Award under his belt and, if it wasn’t for that freak injury in August, would have a strong case for a second one. Guy has a career line of .285/.386/.515 and he turned 26 four days ago. He’s younger than Aaron Judge.

My view of things is that players should ignore the media for the most part, but they don’t always do that. Sometimes the hostility or criticism of the local press — especially from the most respected portions of the local press who have the ability to shape fan sentiment — gets to them.

Which is to say that, if this kind of noise keeps up, I wouldn’t be shocked if Harper puts up a line of .340/.480/.650 in 2018 and then walked the hell out of D.C. for New York or Chicago or L.A. or something. Would anyone blame him?