Eric Chavez, unlike Derek Jeter, wants to be a manager

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Earlier this week Derek Jeter laughed off a question about whether he’d like to become a manager someday, saying: “No chance. No chance. Nada. Zero. No, not a chance.”

His Yankees teammate Eric Chavez, however, has been thinking about managing for a while now, telling Dan Barbarisi of the Wall Street Journal:

One way or the other, I want to stay in the game. In the last four years I’ve had to learn so much, that I feel there’s a lot I want to pass on. … Before, I was just playing. It was just about me, about me getting ready. But then that last year in Oakland, it changed—it started to feel more about giving back. Talking to guys, helping out. That’s when people started asking me about managing.

Chavez’s career has been plagued by injuries, but at his peak he was one of the best all-around third basemen in baseball and he’s having a resurgence at age 34 by hitting .294 with an .879 OPS in 85 games as a part-time player.

Even with all the injuries derailing his career in his twenties Chavez’s resume as a player beats most managers pretty easily and both Joe Girardi and Nick Swisher told Barbarisi that they think Chavez would make a good skipper.

Of course, with the way he’s playing right now it might be a while.

Troy Tulowitzki poses as a pitcher on photo day

Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images
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Update: The photographer was apparently in on the action, according to Topps. Still pretty funny. (Hat tip: Mike Ashmore)

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Thursday marked photo day for the Blue Jays. There are always some oddities, usually when the players create fun for themselves. This time, the fun happened when a photographer mistook shortstop Troy Tulowitzki for a pitcher. Tulowitzki rolled with it and followed the photographer’s instructions to pose like a pitcher.

Hazel Mae has the hilarious video:

Hitters, of course, typically pose with a bat over their shoulder. Pitchers typically have their hand in their glove, sometimes leaning forward as if receiving the signs from their catcher.

Tulowitzki has exclusively played shortstop during his 12-year career in the majors, but perhaps one day he’ll step on the mound and be able to call himself a pitcher.