The Orioles don’t want their pitchers throwing cut fastballs


The cut fastball has certainly increased in popularity over the last several years, not only as the pitch that made Mariano Rivera but also as a go-to offering for starters like Roy Halladay and Jon Lester. The Orioles, though, don’t want their young pitchers throwing cutters, feeling it will take away from their other pitches.

Former A’s and Mets pitching coach Rick Peterson, now Baltimore’s director of pitching development, offered his thoughts on the cutter to MASN’s Steve Melewski:

Typically what we see is the more you throw that cutter, you can become dependent on it and you start to overuse it and typically what happens to guys that overuse the cutter is their fastball velocity drops. That has been consistent over the years.

I’m not saying the cutter is not a good pitch, don’t misunderstand me. A cutter used effectively is a nice addition to your arsenal. But a cutter thrown 40 percent of the time for a young power pitcher can become a crutch, then your velocity drops and you fail to develop your changeup and a breaking ball that has depth to it. The cutter overused is normally not displacing changeups and curveballs, it’s displacing fastballs.

Orioles executive VP Dan Duquette feels the same way about the cutter, and it’s been taken out of top prospect Dylan Bundy’s arsenal since he was drafted last year. Peterson said the Orioles are modeling Bundy’s arsenal after Justin Verlander’s: fastball, curveball, changeup.

The Milwaukee Brewers perform “The Sandlot”

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A lot of teams do funny promo videos during spring training. The Seattle Mariners have led the league in this category for years now, with their marketing and p.r. folks producing and a lot of game and sometimes hammy players starring in some excellent clips. They’re doing them again this year, if you’re curious.

The Milwaukee Brewers have hopped on the humor train in 2018, and their latest entry in this category of commercials is excellent. It’s their riff on “The Sandlot.”

The biggest difference: Smalls really could kill you in this one. Brett Phillips is a lot more jacked than the kid who played Scotty in the original was.

The Beast, however, is just as terrifying now as he was in 1993.