Injured youth receives $14.5 million after being hit by liner

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The family of Steven Domalewski received $14.5 million to settle its lawsuit with Little League Baseball, The Sports Authority and Hillerich and Bradsby on Wednesday.

Domalewski, then nine, was struck in the chest by a line drive while pitching in a Police Athletic League game in 2006. He went into cardiac arrest, and while paramedics were able to get him breathing again, he was left with brain damage after going 15-20 minutes without oxygen.

“The Domalewskis are still saddened by the tragic events of June 2006, but this settlement provides them with some relief and comfort that Steven will get the care he needs for the rest of his life,” said the family’s attorney, Ernest Fronzuto. “He still can’t perform any functions of daily life on his own.”

Although Domalewski wasn’t playing in a Little League game, Little League Baseball did sanction the Louisville Slugger metal bat that was used to hit the liner. The Sports Authority sold the bat, and Hillerich and Bradsby manufactured it. Now each is out millions of dollars because of some very bad luck.

Of course, young Steven’s life was ruined by the incident. Ideally, this money will be used to make sure he’s provided for and treated well. Still, one imagines there will be enough left over for shiny new cars and island getaways for the family and lawyers.

Yankees to hire Josh Bard as their new bench coach

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Aaron Boone has no experience as a coach or a manager at any level. As such, some have speculated that he’d hire a more seasoned hand as his bench coach as he begins his first season as Yankees manager. Someone like, say, Eric Wedge, who was a candidate for the job Boone got and who once managed Boone in Cleveland.

Nope. According to MLB.com’s Mark Feinsand, he’s going with Josh Bard.

Bard, 39, was a teammate of Boone’s with the Indians in 2005. He’s not without coaching experience, having spent the last two seasons as the Dodgers’ bullpen coach, but he’s not that Gene Lamont/Don Zimmer-type we often see in the bench coach role.

Which is fine because different managers want different things from their bench coach. Some are strategy guys, helping with in-game decision making. Others are relationship guys who help managers understand all of the dynamics of the clubhouse while they’re worrying more about lineups and stuff. Others are trust guys, who can serve as the manager’s sounding board, among other things. Some are combinations of all of these things. As Feinsand notes in his story, Boone said at his introductory press conference that he’s looking for this:

“I want smart sitting next to me. I want confidence sitting next to me. I want a guy who can walk out into that room and as I talk about relationships I expect to have with my players, I expect that even to be more so with my coaching staff. Whether that is a guy with all kinds of experience or little experience. I am not concerned about that.”