Sorry Yankees fans: you can’t sue anyone if a terrorist attack hits Yankee Stadium

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Apparently this happened last month, but I missed it. There’s a new article up about it now, though, and it reminds us of the world in which we live these days:

In July, Yankee Stadium became the first sports facility to earn the coveted federal “Safety Act” designation. That means the facility has passed a battery of tests and won approval from the Department of Homeland Security, so the Yankees have been granted a wide-ranging immunity from future lawsuits that might stem from terrorist attacks.

I’m not terribly familiar with this designation, but I came across it (or something like it) back in the legal days in the form of products liability protection for companies that make certain anti-terrorism technologies or take certain anti-terrorism measures.

The idea is that we don’t want to punish people for being unsuccessful in combating terrorism and creating a situation in which someone is better off not even trying to do something safe (when they can claim the terrorism was totally unforeseen) than it is to try to combat it and come up short. In the stadium context, it allows the Yankees to do, well, whatever the Yankees may try to do security-wise, without later having someone say that they did it in a substandard manner and filing suit.

I get it and understand the incentives in play. And God knows that people will come out of the woodwork to sue if something were to happen. But like any other sort of lawsuit immunity, it’s a double-edged sword. Yes, it may grant the Yankees greater latitude to do the right thing, but it will also incentivize them (and enable them) to make it way harder for people to sue them for legitimate things. “Oh, our beer vendor hit you over the head with his tray? Sorry, but that’s terrorism!”

Maybe that sounds crazy to you, but anyone who has ever been involved in the lawsuit biz knows that crazier things happen all the time and that there’s very little downside to asserting silly defenses like that. Because hey, they may work, and even if they don’t, they delay things.

(thanks to reader Johanna S. for the heads up)

Jose Altuve and Corey Kluber head list of Esurance MLB Award winners

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The 2017 MLB award season officially drew to a close on Friday with the Esurance MLB Awards, handed out to the best hitters, pitchers, front office members and moments in the 2017 season. Jose Altuve was crowned the Best Major Leaguer overall, beating out fellow finalists Giancarlo Stanton and Aaron Judge, while two-time Cy Young Award winner Corey Kluber took home honors as Best Pitcher.

Here’s the full list of winners:

  • Best Rookie: Aaron Judge
  • Best Defensive Player: Nolan Arenado
  • Personality of the Year: Adrian Beltre
  • Best Postseason Major Leaguer: Jose Altuve and Justin Verlander
  • Best Postseason Moment: Alex Bregman‘s 10th inning walk-off single in Game 5 of the World Series (video)
  • Best TV/Radio Call: Joe Buck and John Smoltz call Jose Altuve’s game-tying three-run blast in Game 5 of the World Series (video)
  • Best Play (Offense): Nolan Arenado completes the cycle with a walk-off homer (video)
  • Best Play (Defense): Austin Jackson‘s over-the-wall catch in the Red Sox’ bullpen (video)
  • Best Single-Game Performance: Anthony Rendon‘s six-hit, three-homer, 10-RBI game (video)
  • Best Player-Fan Interaction: Joey Votto gives Walter “Superbubz” Herbert a bat and jersey (video)
  • Best Fan Catch: Fan’s brother-in-law grabs Yasiel Puig home run ball and chucks it back on the field (video)
  • Best Manager: A.J. Hinch
  • Best Executive: Jeff Luhnow

No surprises here — the world champion Astros ran away with seven awards, including those for Best Manger and Executive and a dual award for Best Major Leaguer of the Postseason. Altuve added to an impressive run this offseason after earning a Silver Slugger, two Players Choice Awards, Hank Aaron Award and MVP Award for his outstanding work in 2017, while Yankees’ slugger Aaron Judge continued to be a lock for all AL rookie-based awards after locking down the Rookie of the Year title earlier this week.