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Sorry Yankees fans: you can’t sue anyone if a terrorist attack hits Yankee Stadium

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Apparently this happened last month, but I missed it. There’s a new article up about it now, though, and it reminds us of the world in which we live these days:

In July, Yankee Stadium became the first sports facility to earn the coveted federal “Safety Act” designation. That means the facility has passed a battery of tests and won approval from the Department of Homeland Security, so the Yankees have been granted a wide-ranging immunity from future lawsuits that might stem from terrorist attacks.

I’m not terribly familiar with this designation, but I came across it (or something like it) back in the legal days in the form of products liability protection for companies that make certain anti-terrorism technologies or take certain anti-terrorism measures.

The idea is that we don’t want to punish people for being unsuccessful in combating terrorism and creating a situation in which someone is better off not even trying to do something safe (when they can claim the terrorism was totally unforeseen) than it is to try to combat it and come up short. In the stadium context, it allows the Yankees to do, well, whatever the Yankees may try to do security-wise, without later having someone say that they did it in a substandard manner and filing suit.

I get it and understand the incentives in play. And God knows that people will come out of the woodwork to sue if something were to happen. But like any other sort of lawsuit immunity, it’s a double-edged sword. Yes, it may grant the Yankees greater latitude to do the right thing, but it will also incentivize them (and enable them) to make it way harder for people to sue them for legitimate things. “Oh, our beer vendor hit you over the head with his tray? Sorry, but that’s terrorism!”

Maybe that sounds crazy to you, but anyone who has ever been involved in the lawsuit biz knows that crazier things happen all the time and that there’s very little downside to asserting silly defenses like that. Because hey, they may work, and even if they don’t, they delay things.

(thanks to reader Johanna S. for the heads up)

Adrian Beltre puts his helmet on backwards to face a switch pitcher

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“A” switch pitcher is probably not the most accurate way to put that. It’s more like “The” switch pitcher, as Pat Venditte of the Mariners is the only one extant.

Last night the right-handed hitting Adrian Beltre had to face Venditte, who obviously chose to pitch righty to the Rangers third baseman. Before coming up to the plate, Beltre jokingly donned his helmet backwards and pretended that he’d hit left-handed:

 

He needn’t have bothered. Beltre doubled to left field off of Venditte, showing that at some point, platoon splits really don’t matter.

MLB, MLBPA donate $250,000 for Louisiana flood relief

BATON ROUGE, LA - AUGUST 15:  Richard Schafer navigates a boat past a flooded home on August 15, 2016 in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Record-breaking rains pelted Louisiana over the weekend leaving the city with historic levels of flooding that have caused at least seven deaths and damaged thousands of homes.  (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
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Major League Baseball and the Major League Baseball Players Association announced this morning that they are contributing $250,000 to assist victims of the devastating floods that recently hit Louisiana.

The $250,000 contribution is being divided among three charitable organizations: The American Red Cross will receive a $125,000 contribution and two charities connected to Major League Players – the Baton Rouge Area Foundation and High Socks for Hope – will each receive a $62,500 contribution.

According to the joint press release, several players with connections to the area, including Reid Brignac, Will Harris, Wade LeBlanc, Mikie Mahtook, Anthony Ranaudo and Ryan Schimpf were consulted in determining which organizations would receive funding support.

Nice move, union and league.