MLBPA head Michael Weiner being treated for a brain tumor

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Awful news from a press release from the players’ union today:

The Major League Baseball Players Association today announced that Executive Director Michael Weiner began treatment for a brain tumor on Monday, August 20. Michael’s treatments are expected to last about one month, and it is anticipated that he will continue to work out of the Union’s New York office on a daily basis during this time.

Michael would like to thank in advance all those who join the Union staff and player membership in wishing him well as he undergoes his treatment, and he looks forward to making a full recovery.

Best wishes to a good man for a full recovery.

UPDATE: Bud Selig has issued a statement:

“On behalf of Major League Baseball and the 30 Major League Clubs, I send my best wishes to Michael Weiner and his family.  I have great respect and admiration for Michael, with whom we have had a very constructive relationship both professionally and personally.  This relationship has been a great benefit to Baseball and has led to the tremendous success the game now enjoys.  All of us look forward to Michael’s full recovery and to his continued contributions to our game.”

Umpire admits he blew the call that got Joe Maddon ejected last night

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Last night in the top of the eighth inning of the Dodgers-Cubs game, Curtis Granderson struck out. Or, at the very least, he should’ve. After the game, the umpire who said he didn’t admitted he screwed up.

While trying to squelch a Dodgers comeback, Wade Davis got Granderson into a 2-2 count. Davis threw his pitch, Granderson whiffed on it, it hit the dirt, and Willson Contreras applied the tag for the out. End of the inning, right? Wrong: Granderson argued to home plate umpire Jim Wolf that he made slight contact with the ball, Wolf, after conferring with the other umps agreed, and Granderson lived to see another pitch.

Before he’d see that pitch, Joe Maddon came out to argue the call and got so agitated about it all he was ejected for the second time in this series. He was right to argue:

It all ended up not mattering, of course, because Granderson struck out eventually anyway.

Normally such things end there, but after the game a reporter got to Wolf and Wolf did something umpires don’t often do: he admitted he blew the call:

It’s good that the bad call ended up not affecting anything. But the part of me who likes to stir up crap and watch chaos rule in baseball really kinda wishes that Granderson had hit a series-clinching homer right after that. At least as long as it didn’t result in Cubs fans burning Chicago to the ground.