Phillies merchandise sales down 60% this year

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I will never say that Phillies fans don’t support their team. They obviously do, and with great fervor and zeal.  To the extent I take issue with them over their level of support is when Phillies fans lay claim to some sort of Phillies Fan Exceptionalism in which they not only support their team to a higher degree, but that they do so in some qualitatively different way. When they claim not just that they have more fans who show up in greater numbers, but that they are better fans in some way, immune to the hot-and-cold running fandom of other teams.

I take issue with this because, any time you look at the numbers, you realize that it’s not the case. Phillies fans, like everyone else, like a winner and get rather “meh” about things when their team loses. From the Philly Inquirer:

The sale of licensed Major League Baseball merchandise was a $5 billion business in 2011, and the 102-win Phillies, according to figures provided by SportsOneSource, accounted for an astonishingly large share, 16.2 percent … But in this 2012 season, when the club’s run of on-field success has come to a sudden, screeching halt, the falloff in those sales has mirrored the deterioration of its won-loss record.

According to SportsOneSource, a Maine firm that monitors the sale of sports-related merchandise at outlets other than ballparks, the purchase of Phillies-related products has declined by 60 percent.

They’re still second to the Yankees in gross sales, but market share has dipped to 8.9 percent.

Still great, obviously, but evidence that, as a fan base, they haven’t broken old paradigms and that people get more excited about them when they win than when they lose. Like just about everyone else.

Reds sign outfielders Mason Williams and Rosell Herrera to minor league deals

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The Reds picked up outfielders Mason Williams and Rosell Herrera on minor league deals, MLB.com’s Mark Sheldon reports. Both Williams and Herrera will receive invites to spring training and could compete for backup outfield roles behind Adam Duvall, Billy Hamilton and Scott Schebler.

Williams, 26, completed a three-year track with the Yankees in 2017. He has yet to see a full season of playing time, however, and went 4-for-17 with two stolen bases during a five-game span with the club in 2017. While not a power hitter, his speed and steady contact rate produced a .263/.309/.318 batting line over 437 plate appearances in Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre, including two home runs, three triples and 19 stolen bases.

Herrera, 25, has yet to make his big league debut. After seven years in the Rockies’ system, he finally reached Triple-A Albuquerque in 2017 and slashed .278/.351/.394 with three home runs and 20 stolen bases in 363 PA. He looks most comfortable in the left field corner, but has some experience at shortstop and third base and should give the Reds a nice utility option come spring.