Bobby Valentine sticks up for Adrian Gonzalez, both get tossed

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Does a double ejection count as a bonding experience?

After Adrian Gonzalez was tossed for arguing a pitch in the eighth inning Wednesday against Baltimore, Bobby Valentine took up the complaint on his behalf and was also ejected. The Red Sox went on to lose the game 5-3.

It was just the second career ejection for the usually mild-mannered Gonzalez. At least, mild-mannered on the field. Gonzalez was reportedly the ringleader in calling the meeting that asked for Valentine’s ouster as Red Sox manager, though that’s a claim he denied Wednesday.

Gonzalez’s complaint was that he was quick-pitched by Orioles reliever Pedro Strop on his groundout, a fact that Strop acknowledged after the game. “I haven’t got told that it’s illegal,” he told MLB.com’s Brittany Ghiroli after the game. “So, if it’s been working, I’m going to keep doing it.”

Gonzalez said the pitch should have been ruled a ball, WEEI reports.

“My problem with that is that they all interpret their own way,” Gonzalez said. “Frankie [Morales] does it earlier in the year and they call it a ball. When I talked to the umpire that day they said the hitter wasn’t ready to hit. That’s what we base it on. I wasn’t ready to hit. That’s what I went back to tell [home plate umpire Mike Everitt].”

Valentine agreed, arguing the quick pitch is “dangerous.”

Perhaps it’s a case of too little, too late, but Valentine backing up one of his best players certainly can’t hurt his cause. Too bad it came in yet another loss.

Rays pitcher Brent Honeywell leaves BP session with possible injury

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This is not good: Marc Topkin of the Tampa Bay Times reports that Rays pitcher Brent Honeywell cut short a bullpen session this morning and left the field with a trainer. Topkin says Honeywell was “clearly upset” as he made his way into the clubhouse and “cursed loudly a few times.”

Obviously you don’t want to assume the worst, but that’s often the behavior of a pitcher who experienced a serious injury. We will get updates later and will provide an update when we hear.

Honeywell, probably the Rays’ top prospect, is slated to make his major league debut early this season, though possibly not for a few weeks into the season due to off days. Eventually, though, it is assumed he’d slot in someplace behind Chris Archer, Matt Andriese, Nathan Eovaldi, Jake Faria, and Blake Snell, either as a young-David Price-style swingman, a spot starter or a regular starter at some point.

Last year Honeywell posted a 3.49 ERA and 172/35 K/BB ratio in 136. innings in 26 starts between Double-A Montgomery and Triple-A Durham.