Rajai Davis

And That Happened: Sunday’s scores and highlights

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Blue Jays 10, Yankees 7: Holy frijole, did you see Rajai Davis’ catch, robbing Casey McGehee of a home run in the seventh? The guy is like 5”9″ and the wall is like ten feet and he went Spud Webb on that bad boy. Or Spiderman. Or something. Just wow. Otherwise, the Jays beat the tar out of Phil Hughes. Oh, and Davis led the charge there too, doubling in five runs. That was on two different doubles, though. Because you really can’t drive in five runs on one double. That would create some sort of divide-by-zero error or something.

Phillies 8, Cardinals 7: These are weird times for me. I had to root for the Phillies here because the Braves need the Cardinals (or the Dodgers or Pirates or whoever) to lose more to give them a more comfortable wild card cushion. Meanwhile I’m going to Washington on Friday where I’ll be watching the Mets-Nationals game. I have no frickin’ idea what to do there. I want the Nats to start losing because of the NL East race but I can’t, on general principle, root for the Mets. Oh, Jimmy Rollins Juan Pierre won it with an RBI single in the 11th.

Dodgers 5, Marlins 0: Chris Capuano? More like Chris Capuwonderful!  Oh, God. I’m so sorry. I don’t know what came over me. 8 IP, 2 H, 0 ER, 10K.

Diamondbacks 7, Nationals 4: Wow, the Nats finally lost. It had been eight straight wins. Patrick Corbin gave up two runs, struck out seven and didn’t walk anyone. Unusual stuff on the bases: In the first, Bryce Harper reached first on an overthrown ball but couldn’t advance to second because he collided with the umpire. Then he was picked off. In the second, Paul Goldschmidt reached on an error, taking second on the play. Then stole third. Then scored when Kurt Suzuki threw the ball away.

Mariners 4, Angels 1: Wow, Jered Weaver finally lost. It had been nine straight wins. Jesus Montero homered twice. And while Weaver didn’t pitch too poorly overall — he was saved from giving up a homer to Miquel Olivo by a Mike Trout leaping catch — Jason Vargas outpitched him. Overall, actually, Vargas has outpitched Weaver since the beginning of July.

Giants 9, Rockies 6: The Giants jumped out to a 3-0 lead, blew it, fell behind 6-4 by the seventh and then put up five runs in the eighth, capped by Hunter Pence’s tie-breaking and game-winning three-run homer. Folks at AT&T Park got their money’s worth.

Rangers 8, Tigers 3: Josh Hamilton had three hits including a homer and three RBI. That helped make up for another shaky Yu Darvish performance. Sure, he only allowed three runs, but he walked five. In other news, no one in this game looked as good as anyone in Saturday night’s game. Dear God, look at how awesome those uniforms are.

Reds 3, Cubs 0: Johny Cueto stays in the NL Cy Young conversation (8 IP, 3 H, 0 ER). he wouldn’t be my pick if the season ended today, but he’s having an outstanding year.

Brewers 5, Astros 3: It’s not often that someone beating the Astros on the last day of a series prevents a sweep, but it applies to the Brewers. In fact, Milwaukee had lost 11 straight road games — a streak stretching back before the All-Star break. Yovani Gallardo gets the win. He has won 10 straight decisions against Houston. This being the Brewers, of course, nothing is easy and the game ended with Houston threatening.

Rays 7, Twins 3: Someone with some time on their hands: find out what year saw the most games with extra inning games ending with the road team winning by four runs or more. It seems like it’s happened a bunch this year. It’s as if bullpens all over the league just decided “Eh, who needs a long game? Let’s end this thing definitively.” By the way, the Rays are 6-0 since Evan Longoria came back. They’ve passed the Orioles, are five back of the Yankees and are at the top of the wild card standings.

Pirates 11, Padres 5: I’m not sure what’s more unlikely: Jason Marquis two-hit shutout on Saturday night or Clint Barmes grand slam yesterday. This series was run by space aliens who are conducting experiments on us or something.

White Sox 7, Athletics 3: I guess Chris Sale got his wind back thanks to that long rest a couple of starts ago. He struck out 11 here and didn’t walk any in six and two-thirds.

Orioles 5, Royals 3: Manny Machado homered again (in case you missed it he homered twice on Friday night). In the two games he hasn’t homered in he’s tripled and hit an RBI double. As far as hope-for-the-future goes, this kinda tops Rocky Coppinger for O’s fans. By a fair amount.

Red Sox 14, Indians 1: Boston beat Cleveland so hard their kids are gonna come out shaking. Jon Lester finally wins a game, striking out 12 in six innings.

Mets 6, Braves 5: The Mets bullpen made it interesting in the ninth, allowing four runs, but they managed to not totally screw up Jon Niese’s nice night (8 IP, 6 H, 1 ER). Ben Sheets reminded us that, no, a guy with a rebuilt everything can’t be counted on to pitch like an ace for half a season.

Report: Marlins intent on adding a big-three reliever

CHICAGO, IL - JULY 28:  Aroldis Chapman #54 of the Chicago Cubs pitches in the 9th inning against the Chicago Cubs at Wrigley Field on July 28, 2016 in Chicago, Illinois. The Cubs defeated the White Sox 3-1.  (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)
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The Marlins are intent on adding one of the three best relievers available on the free agent market, Jon Heyman of FanRag Sports reports. Those three, of course, are Aroldis Chapman, Kenley Jansen, and Mark Melancon.

As Ashley noted earlier, Melancon is reportedly fielding multiple four-year offers in excess of $60 million. The price tags for Chapman and Jansen are likely to match or exceed that. The Marlins haven’t typically been eager to whip out the checkbook for free agents but with the bullpen being the name of the game in baseball these days, GM Michael Hill may feel the need to match his rivals.

The Nationals, Giants, Yankees, Cubs, and Dodgers are the teams most often linked to the “big-three” group of relievers, so it won’t be easy for the Marlins.

A.J. Ramos handled the closer’s role for the Marlins this past season and did an admirable job, saving 40 games with a 2.81 ERA and a 73/35 K/BB ratio in 64 innings. There’s no doubt, though, that Chapman, Jansen, or Melancon would represent a significant upgrade in the ninth inning.

Bryan Price likely to use Raisel Iglesias, Tony Cingrani, and Michael Lorenzen in closer’s role

Cincinnati Reds starting pitcher Raisel Iglesias throws in the first inning of their opening day baseball game against the Philadelphia Phillies, Monday, April 4, 2016, in Cincinnati. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
AP Photo/John Minchillo
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C. Trent Rosecrans of the Cincinnati Enquirer reports that Reds manager Bryan Price is likely going to use a trio of pitchers in the closer’s role: Raisel Iglesias, Tony Cingrani, and Michael Lorenzen. At RedsFest on Saturday, Price said:

I’d say right now that we have a series of guys that I’m comfortable with in the ninth inning and that would include (Raisel) Iglesias, (Tony) Cingrani and (Michael Lorenzen). Should we stay with this format – which I intend to do – all three of those guys and maybe more could have opportunities in save situations. At this point in time, there’s no defined closer. There are multiple options and I’d like to stick with the philosophy that we’re going to have our multi-inning guys, so we’re going to need multi-closers.

This seems to be part of the new bullpen zeitgeist in which managers are shying away from strictly-defined roles for their relievers. Indians manager Terry Francona’s postseason success using Andrew Miller likely had some degree of influence on Price’s willingness to go with a three-headed giant.

Iglesias started the 2016 season in the Reds’ rotation but missed two months with an injury, then moved to the bullpen in late June. Price put him in the closer’s role down the stretch in September. The right-hander overall finished the season with a 2.53 ERA and an 83/26 K/BB ratio in 78 1/3 innings.

Cingrani battled control issues in his 63 innings of work this past season, finishing with a 4.14 ERA and a 49/37 K/BB ratio. He’s left-handed, though, and gives Price some matchup flexibility in the late innings.

Lorenzen impressed in his first full season as a reliever, ending the year with a 2.88 ERA and a 48/13 K/BB ratio in 50 innings. The right-hander uses a fastball that sits around 96 MPH on average along with a cutter and slider.