Cubs hit new low, commit five errors in loss to Reds

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The Cubs snapped their eight-game losing streak by beating the Reds on Thursday, but they returned to typical form Friday, committing five errors in a 10-8 loss to Cincinnati.

Anthony Rizzo, Starlin Castro, Josh Vitters, Brett Jackson and Welington Castillo all had miscues on a very windy day at Wrigley Field. The Cubs had five errors for the first time since committing six on Sept. 12, 2006 against the Dodgers.

Besides the errors, the Cubs had two wild pitches and a passed ball, they had two runners thrown out on the basepaths (Alfonso Soriano at home in the third, Starlin Castro at third with no outs in the sixth) and they had an outfield collision on a ball that dropped in the eighth, giving Brandon Phillips a single.

It wasn’t a particularly pretty game for the Reds either, but they did take advantage just enough to snap their five-game losing streak. Jonathan Broxton nearly blew a 9-6 lead by giving up two runs in the eighth, but Aroldis Chapman came in to get the final out of the inning and send the Reds on to the ninth up 9-8. After the offense got him an insurance run, he pitched a perfect ninth for his 26th save.

Troy Tulowitzki poses as a pitcher on photo day

Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images
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Update: The photographer was apparently in on the action, according to Topps. Still pretty funny. (Hat tip: Mike Ashmore)

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Thursday marked photo day for the Blue Jays. There are always some oddities, usually when the players create fun for themselves. This time, the fun happened when a photographer mistook shortstop Troy Tulowitzki for a pitcher. Tulowitzki rolled with it and followed the photographer’s instructions to pose like a pitcher.

Hazel Mae has the hilarious video:

Hitters, of course, typically pose with a bat over their shoulder. Pitchers typically have their hand in their glove, sometimes leaning forward as if receiving the signs from their catcher.

Tulowitzki has exclusively played shortstop during his 12-year career in the majors, but perhaps one day he’ll step on the mound and be able to call himself a pitcher.