Rockford Files

And That Happened: Tuesday’s scores and highlights


Tigers 6, Yankees 5: Miguel Cabrera homered for the third straight game. The dude is good. The Tigers have won six straight and, with the White Sox loss, pull to within a half game. Speaking of the Tigers, I found out last night that one of the people I hung out with at Comerica Park this past weekend wrote a book about “The Rockford Files” that was published yesterday. That’s him, as a young man, on the cover next to Garner. And he also owns a Rockford-style gold Firebird, which is for sale and looks suh-weet. How did none of this come out over the three days I spent with this guy?

Phillies 3, Braves 0: Philly breaks the losing streak to Atlanta via a Cole Hamels shutout. Ryan Howard hit a two-run homer. This is how they drew things up once upon a time.

Marlins 4, Mets 2: Jose Reyes extends his hitting streak to 25 and his being-booed-at-Citi-Field streak to two. Giancarlo Stanton hit a sac fly in his return. The Mets have dropped eight in a row at home.

Diamondbacks 10, Pirates 4: Chris Johnson smacks two homers, helping the Dbacks rally for seven runs in the last two innings to beat Pittsburgh. The Pirates have dropped three of five. It’s too early to worry, though. Right? RIGHT?

Brewers 3, Reds 1: Well, I suppose it really is too early to worry about the Pirates, what with the Reds dropping three in a row themselves. Mike Fiers shut them down, tossing eight innings of one run ball and striking out seven.

Giants 4, Cardinals 2: Cards lose too, so I guess it doesn’t matter for any of the contenders in that division. Barry Zito was effective and Buster Posey hit a three-run homer.

Royals 5, White Sox 2: Country Breakfast was two for four with a yicketty. Can’t tell from the box score if it was mammo.

Rays 4, Blues Jays 1: Evan Longoria came back and went 1 for 3 with an RBI. J.A. Hapless allowed four runs in four and a third innings for the Jays.

Rangers 6, Red Sox 3: Ryan Dempster notches his first win as a Ranger. He pitched shutout ball into the seventh inning. No earned runs, but the three unearned runs came on a home run he gave up to Will Middlebrooks after an error. Unearned runs are stupid. I mean, it’s not like he didn’t sever up a three run dinger there. It did happen, and it happened because he got smacked. Whatever.

Twins 7, Indians 5: That’s 11 straight losses for Cleveland. This one coming when the Twins plated six runs in the final three innings thanks in part to bad Cleveland defense. Chris Perez blew his second save in three days. The recently-recalled  Tsuyoshi Nishioka hit a sac fly to give Minnesota the lead. Because he’s clutch like that.

Nationals 3, Astros 2: Danny Espinosa hit a two-run homer and then hit an RBI single in the 12th, accounting for all of Washington’s runs. Houston threatened in the bottom of the inning but Roger Bernadina made a diving catch into the wall to end the game.

Rockies 3, Dodgers 1: One-man wrecking crews were a thing last night I guess, because Josh Rutledge did it too. He had three doubles and a single, driving in all three Colorado runs. Rutledge, who is filling in for Troy Tulowitzki, was called up from Double-A around the All-Star break and has since driven in 18 runs in 22 games.

Padres 7, Cubs 4: Seven straight losses for the Cubs. Carlos Quentin hit a three run homer.

Orioles 8, Mariners 7: Baltimore wins yet another one run game, and another extra innings games, continuing its charmed existence in that regard. They’ve won 12 straight extra innings games, actually, five of which lasted 13 innings or more. Two homers for Matt Wieters. Hey, remember these?

Athletics 10, Angels 4: Bartolo Colon pitched seven scoreless innings, extending his scoreless innings streak to 22 and a third. The A’s racked up 13 hits including four homers off Angels pitching.

White Sox sign catcher Alex Avila to a one-year deal

Detroit Tigers' Alex Avila, right, is congratulated by third base coach Dave Clark after his solo home run in the third inning in the second game of a baseball doubleheader against the Chicago White Sox, Monday, Sept. 21, 2015, in Detroit. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)
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There have been a lot of articles published in the past few days about how to navigate awkward Thanksgiving conversations with your relatives. Heck, we even wrote one.

But there’s always room for more! Such as “How to talk to your father at Thanksgiving dinner about the fact that he let you walk away from the only team you’ve ever known to sign with a division rival.” Which is what Alex Avila will likely be talking about with his father, Tigers GM Al Avila:

The older Avila can’t even say he did it because he’s opposed to nepotism. After all, he just hired his other son — who has had his law degree for just over a year — as the Tigers assistant legal counsel for baseball operations. Though I’m sure that wasn’t nepotism. He probably just aced the interview and impressed everyone more than the other candidates did.

OK, those are jokes. In all seriousness, this is a good move for Alex and Al and, probably, the White Sox. With the emergence of James McCann, there really is not space for Alex Avila in Detroit in anything other than a backup capacity. In Chicago, he’ll get more playing time. At least if he can (a) stay healthy; and (b) not hit .191/.339/.287 again like he did in 2015.

Pirates sign outfielder/first baseman Jake Goebbert

Jake Goebbert
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The best thing about minor Thanksgiving week transactions is that they are almost certainly done by GMs frantically looking for some work to do rather than go pick up their in-laws at the airport. I mean, sure, the player in question could very easily be an important player who fills a key role in the organization, but it’s not like it couldn’t have waited until Monday, right? This is the GM equivalent of you pretending you have to run into the office on Wednesday afternoon and, in reality, driving around in your car, listening to Neil Young and promising that NEXT YEAR you’re just doing a small Thanksgiving dinner with no family and, maybe, might even go on a little trip, just you and the wife.

Or is that just me? OK, maybe that’s just me.

Anyway, that’s how I’m choosing to view the Pirates activity today. First they traded for Allen Webster and now they’re signing minor league free agent first baseman/outfielder Jake Goebbert, according to Adam Berry of

Goebbert, 28, hit .294 with an .844 OPS and 10 homers for Triple-A El Paso last season. He has 115 plate appearances in the bigs, all for San Diego in 2014. Overall he has a line of .282/.386/.465 with 30 homers in 997 Triple-A plate appearances in the Astros, Athletics and Padres organizations.

Not a bad depth move, especially given that the Pirates are looking to trade Pedro Alvarez and otherwise re-jigger their first base situation.

Blue Jays sell Triple-A MVP Matt Hague to Japanese team

Matt Hague Blue Jays
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Matt Hague got a cup of coffee in Toronto this year after winning the International League MVP, but the 30-year-old first baseman/third baseman found a better opportunity in Japan and the Blue Jays have sold him to the Hanshin Tigers.

Hague hit .338 in 136 games at Triple-A this past season and is a career .301 hitter in eight minor-league seasons overall, but his lack of power limits his opportunities in the majors and he’s received a grand total of 91 plate appearances as a big leaguer.

Ben Nicholson-Smith of Toronto Sportnet reports that the sale price for Hague is $300,000, which goes to the Blue Jays. And then Hague will no doubt sign a deal for a lot more than he could have earned at Triple-A and perhaps more than the MLB minimum salary.

Diamondbacks trade Allen Webster to the Pirates

Allen Webster
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The Arizona Diamondbacks just announced that have traded righty Allen Webster to the Pirates for cash considerations.

Webster, who turns 26 in February, was DFA’d by the Dbacks a few days ago. He pitched in nine games, starting five, in 2015, posting a 5.81 ERA and a K/BB ratio of 17/20 (eww) in 31 innings. Before that he pitched 89.1 innings for the Red Sox over two years with numbers not too terribly more impressive than that.