Todd Helton to undergo season-ending hip surgery, plans to play next year

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Todd Helton injured his hip in early June and spent two weeks on the disabled list last month before rejoining the lineup, but the Rockies announced that the 38-year-old first baseman will undergo season-ending surgery Friday to repair a torn labrum.

Helton told Patrick Saunders of the Denver Post that he chose to have the surgery now because the recovery timetable is typically six months and he wants to be ready for spring training and plans to play next season.

Helton had a bounceback season last year, hitting .302 with an .850 OPS, but will finish this year hitting just .238 with a .743 OPS in a career-low 69 games. He’ll be paid $5 million next season in the final year of a long-term contract, but as part of the renegotiated deal the Rockies will owe him another $13 million in deferred money to be paid out from 2014-2023.

Colorado selected Helton with the eighth overall pick in the 1995 draft and he’s played his entire 16-season career for the Rockies, hitting .320 with 354 homers in 2,123 games for a .964 OPS that ranks third among active hitters. That includes a .350 batting average and 1.060 OPS at Coors Field, compared to a .289 batting average and .864 OPS on the road.

Martin Maldonado and Willson Contreras say they’re willing to pay fines rather than follow new mound visit rule

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On Monday, Major League Baseball announced some changes aimed at improving the game’s pace of play, something that has been a pet cause for commissioner Rob Manfred. Among the changes was a limit on mound visits whether from managers and coaches, the catcher, or other defenders. Each team will have six non-pitching change mound visits per game and one additional visit each inning in extra innings. Craig wrote more in depth on the changes here if you happened to miss it.

Angels catcher Martin Maldonado says he is going to do what’s necessary to stay on the same page with his pitchers. Via Jeff Fletcher of the Orange County Register, Maldonado said, “If the game is on the line, I’m going to go out there. If we’re at six [visits], and it’s going to be the seventh, I’m going to go out there, even if I have to pay a fine. I’m there for the pitchers.”

Cubs catcher Willson Contreras said as much on Tuesday. Per Josh Frydman of WGN News, Contreras said, “What about if you have a tight game and you have to go out there? They can’t say anything about that, that’s my team and we just care about wins. If they’re going to fine me about number seven mound visit, I’ll pay the price.”

Exhibition games haven’t even started yet, but two notable backstops — the lesser-known Maldonado won a Gold Glove last year — are clearly not happy with the rule change. As Craig alluded to in his article yesterday, arguments between catchers and umpires (and, subsequently, managers and umpires) are probably going to become more frequent, which would likely end up nullifying any pace of play improvements.