Indians blow three-run lead in 10th to lose ninth straight

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After taking a backseat for 3 1/2 months, Pythagoras has given the Indians quite a beatdown lately.

The Indians scored three times in the top of the 10th, only to give up five runs in the bottom of the inning and lose 10-8 to the Tigers on Sunday. It was their ninth consecutive defeat.

Miguel Cabrera supplied the walkoff two-run homer after Chris Perez had already allowed three runs and blown the save.

The blown save was Perez’s third. He’s handled the tough chances exceptionally well, going 11-for-11 protecting one-run leads. However, he’s now blown a pair of three-run leads and one two-run lead.

The Indians got their lead in the 10th on back-to-back homers from Travis Hafner and Ezequiel Carrera. It was Carrera’s first homer in 214 major league at-bats. He went 7-for-12 in the series after replacing Johnny Damon in Cleveland’s outfield.

The Indians are now 50-58 on the season. They spent much of the first half of the season over .500 despite a negative run differential. As bad as they’ve played lately, they currently have the worst run differential in the entire American League at -90 (458 runs scored, 548 allowed).

Marlins intend to keep Christian Yelich

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With Giancarlo Stanton and Marcell Ozuna gone, the next logical step for the Marlins would be to trade away Christian Yelich. He’s be an amazingly attractive trade candidate given that he is under team control through 2022, and is owed a very reasonable $58 million or so. He just turned 26 last week and has hit .290/.369/.432 in his five year career. That’s the kind of player and contract that could bring back a mess of prospects.

Except the Marlins, it seems, don’t want to do that. Multiple reports have come out in the last hour saying that the Marlins intend to hold on to Yelich and to build around him.

That could be a negotiating ploy, of course. They’ll no doubt listen to offers and, if the right one comes along, they’d certainly give strong consideration to trading him. A good deal is a good deal.

The only question, in light of the events of the last week, is whether the Marlins would know a good deal if they saw one.