Mike Olt makes Rangers debut as first baseman, No. 8 hitter

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Called up from Double-A late last night, Rangers prospect Mike Olt is making his big-league debut tonight starting at first base and batting eighth.

Olt was primarily a third baseman in the minors and projects as a good defender there long term, but the Rangers already have one of the league’s best all-around third basemen in Adrian Beltre.

As for who he’ll be replacing when he plays … that’s not clear based on tonight’s lineup because manager Ron Washington is using an odd group versus left-hander C.J. Wilson. For one thing, Mike Napoli is on the bench. Beyond that Ian Kinsler is at designated hitter, Michael Young is at second base, Geovany Soto is at catcher, and Craig Gentry is in center field.

Trying to draw any conclusions from that is tough, but Washington indicated to reporters that Olt will play mostly first base and designated hitter versus left-handed pitchers, at least initially.

Olt played exclusively third base during his first two pro seasons, but this year he’s appeared in 13 games at first base and three games in right field along with 78 games at third base. Clearly the Rangers were preparing him for a potential call-up and new defensive role, and they decided to pull the trigger last night after Olt hit .288 with 28 homers and a .977 OPS in 95 games at Double-A.

The Angels were the first team to use up all of their mound visits

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Last night’s Angels-Astros game was a long affair with a bunch of homers and the use of 11 pitchers in all. The Angels used six pitchers and all of that business led to plenty of conferences. Six, in fact, which is their allotment under the new rule capping mound visits. As far as I can tell, that makes the Angels the first team to use up all of their mound visits since the advent of the rule.

Sadly, they did not try to go for a seventh, thereby testing the currently unknown limits of the rule. Umpires have been instructed to not allow additional mound visits, but they cannot issue balls or tackle anyone or anything to enforce it. Presumably, if Maldonado had walked out to talk to Cam Bedrosian about the weather or where he was going to dinner after the game, the home plate umpire would’ve simply done the old Robin Williams English policeman’s bit of yelling “Stop! . . . or I shall yell ‘Stop!’ again!” Maybe a fine would issue later, but we’ll never know.

At least until someone breaks the limit. And we know someone will, right? We should have a betting pool on who does it.