David Ortiz says his right Achilles tendon is at about “50-60 percent”

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Red Sox manager Bobby Valentine mentioned earlier this afternoon that David Ortiz could be activated from the disabled list as soon as this weekend against the Twins, but odds are that’s not going to happen.

According to Scott Lauber of the Boston Herald, Ortiz did some light jogging while the Red Sox were taking batting practice this afternoon and estimated that his strained right Achilles tendon is at about “50-60 percent.” He added that he likely won’t do “power running” for another few days, which essentially rules out the chance that he’ll return this weekend.

“It feels better,” Ortiz said. “The (trainers) were a little surprised about how I was moving compared to when we tried in New York. Like the doctors and trainers say, I’m not going to be 100 percent when I come back to play. But when we start doing the power drills and once I start feeling better, I think I’ll be ready to go.”

Ortiz was in the midst of an 11-game hitting streak prior to suffering the injury while running the bases on July 16 against the White Sox. The 36-year-old slugger is batting .316/.414/.609 with 23 home runs, 58 RBI and a 1.024 OPS in 89 games played this season. The Red Sox have shuffled multiple players out of the DH spot during his absence, including Cody Ross tonight against Twins’ right-hander Samuel Deduno.

Mets invite Tim Tebow to spring training

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Tim Tebow isn’t letting go of his major league dreams just yet. The former NFL quarterback is slated to appear with the Mets during spring training this year, extending what initially looked like an ill-fated career choice for at least one more season. Per the club’s official announcement on Friday, he’ll join a group of spring training invitees that includes top-30 prospects like Peter Alonso, P.J. Conlon, Patrick Mazeika and David Thompson.

Tebow, 30, hasn’t taken to professional baseball as gracefully as expected. He batted a cumulative .226/.309/.347 with eight home runs and a .656 OPS in 486 plate appearances for Single-A Columbia and High-A St. Lucie in 2017. While that wasn’t enough to compel the Mets to give the aging outfielder a big league tryout, there’s no denying that Tebow brought substantial benefit to their minor league affiliates — in the form of increased attendance figures and ticket sales, that is.

Even after the Mets were booted from the NL East race last September, they resisted the idea of promoting Tebow for a late-season attendance boost of their own. That’s not to say they’re planning on taking the same approach in 2018; Tebow will undoubtedly get his cup of coffee in the majors at some point, but for now, a Grapefruit League tryout is likely as close as he’ll ever get to playing with the team’s big league roster on an everyday basis.