Ben Cherington and the Red Sox are in a tough spot

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If you stink, you sell. If you’re doing great, you buy. But Ben Cherington and the Red Sox are sort of screwed at the moment when it comes to trying to figure out what to do at the deadline:

“When we look at where we are in the standings, I guess particularly the teams that are right ahead of us in the wild card chase, we don’t believe that any of those teams are better than us, or necessarily more talented than us … We’re 49-50. We feel this is as good a team as the other teams that are sort of clustered right ahead of us. We also have to be mindful that you have two months left and we’ve dug ourselves a little bit of a hole, and we’ve got to be smart about giving up too many long-term assets to try to get a little better the next two months.”

That comes from an interview he gave to WEEI this morning, which contains a ton of stuff about the conversations the Red Sox have had and haven’t had leading up to the deadline.

I get what Cherington is saying about the talent of the team. But I guess I can’t help but focus on that “cluster” he refers to. There are seven teams ahead of them in the wild card standings. It’s a close cluster — 4.5 games separating them all — but it’s the case that not only do the Sox have to improve, but a lot of teams have to stumble.  It’s hard to count on that.

 

Troy Tulowitzki poses as a pitcher on photo day

Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images
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Update: The photographer was apparently in on the action, according to Topps. Still pretty funny. (Hat tip: Mike Ashmore)

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Thursday marked photo day for the Blue Jays. There are always some oddities, usually when the players create fun for themselves. This time, the fun happened when a photographer mistook shortstop Troy Tulowitzki for a pitcher. Tulowitzki rolled with it and followed the photographer’s instructions to pose like a pitcher.

Hazel Mae has the hilarious video:

Hitters, of course, typically pose with a bat over their shoulder. Pitchers typically have their hand in their glove, sometimes leaning forward as if receiving the signs from their catcher.

Tulowitzki has exclusively played shortstop during his 12-year career in the majors, but perhaps one day he’ll step on the mound and be able to call himself a pitcher.