Zack Greinke: “I don’t really look forward to being traded”

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Milwaukee skipping Zack Greinke’s turn in the rotation last week so he could “recharge his batteries” worked out pretty well, as Greinke returned last night with seven innings of one-run ball in what may be his final Brewers start.

Afterward he declined to discuss the specifics of any contract extension talks, although he did apologize to reporters for doing so and talked pretty openly about his feelings surrounding potentially pitching his last game in a Brewers uniform.

Here’s some of what he said, via Todd Rosiak of the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel:

It’s kind of fun playing here and we’ve got a lot of good players. We’re just not pulling out wins at the moment, which is disappointing. … I really don’t want to think about a different team when I’m on this team. … Obviously something could happen, but I enjoy playing here. I don’t really look forward to being traded from this place, but it could happen. That’s just baseball. I won’t take it personal if it happens. They’ve got to do what they’ve got to do what’s best for the organzation.

Every indication is that the Brewers will trade Greinke by July 31 if they aren’t able to work out a long-term extension and at this point there’s no real indication that extension talks have progressed very far.

Greinke’s next scheduled start is Sunday against the Nationals at Miller Park and the trade deadline is about 48 hours later.

Umpire admits he blew the call that got Joe Maddon ejected last night

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Last night in the top of the eighth inning of the Dodgers-Cubs game, Curtis Granderson struck out. Or, at the very least, he should’ve. After the game, the umpire who said he didn’t admitted he screwed up.

While trying to squelch a Dodgers comeback, Wade Davis got Granderson into a 2-2 count. Davis threw his pitch, Granderson whiffed on it, it hit the dirt, and Willson Contreras applied the tag for the out. End of the inning, right? Wrong: Granderson argued to home plate umpire Jim Wolf that he made slight contact with the ball, Wolf, after conferring with the other umps agreed, and Granderson lived to see another pitch.

Before he’d see that pitch, Joe Maddon came out to argue the call and got so agitated about it all he was ejected for the second time in this series. He was right to argue:

It all ended up not mattering, of course, because Granderson struck out eventually anyway.

Normally such things end there, but after the game a reporter got to Wolf and Wolf did something umpires don’t often do: he admitted he blew the call:

It’s good that the bad call ended up not affecting anything. But the part of me who likes to stir up crap and watch chaos rule in baseball really kinda wishes that Granderson had hit a series-clinching homer right after that. At least as long as it didn’t result in Cubs fans burning Chicago to the ground.