Slumping Mets have little to sell

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Stephen Strasburg made easy work of the Mets lineup on Wednesday, racking up 11 strikeouts while throwing just 94 pitches in seven innings, and the Nationals won 5-2 to complete a three-game sweep in New York.

It was the second straight series in which the Mets have been swept. They’re 1-11 since the All-Star break and now 47-51 for the season.

The brutal stretch leaves little doubt the Mets will sell, rather than buy, at the trade deadline. But the most likely scenario is that they won’t make much noise at all. David Wright, who is under control for 2013, is staying put, and the Mets figure to work hard to sign him to an extension in the offseason. R.A. Dickey is likewise off limits, and with Johan Santana and Dillon Gee on the DL, the Mets no longer have any real pitching depth to use in trades.

So, if the Mets do shed pieces, they figure to be small. If some team wants to give up a prospect for injury-prone starter Chris Young, let them. If anyone is interested in taking on the salaries of disappointing relievers Jon Rauch and Ramon Ramirez, they can go. Tim Byrdak can retire lefties. Outfielders Scott Hairston and Andres Torres make for decent role players. That’s really about it.

Umpire admits he blew the call that got Joe Maddon ejected last night

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Last night in the top of the eighth inning of the Dodgers-Cubs game, Curtis Granderson struck out. Or, at the very least, he should’ve. After the game, the umpire who said he didn’t admitted he screwed up.

While trying to squelch a Dodgers comeback, Wade Davis got Granderson into a 2-2 count. Davis threw his pitch, Granderson whiffed on it, it hit the dirt, and Willson Contreras applied the tag for the out. End of the inning, right? Wrong: Granderson argued to home plate umpire Jim Wolf that he made slight contact with the ball, Wolf, after conferring with the other umps agreed, and Granderson lived to see another pitch.

Before he’d see that pitch, Joe Maddon came out to argue the call and got so agitated about it all he was ejected for the second time in this series. He was right to argue:

It all ended up not mattering, of course, because Granderson struck out eventually anyway.

Normally such things end there, but after the game a reporter got to Wolf and Wolf did something umpires don’t often do: he admitted he blew the call:

It’s good that the bad call ended up not affecting anything. But the part of me who likes to stir up crap and watch chaos rule in baseball really kinda wishes that Granderson had hit a series-clinching homer right after that. At least as long as it didn’t result in Cubs fans burning Chicago to the ground.