Report: Cubs want Allen Webster from Dodgers for Ryan Dempster


With the Dodgers’ top pitching prospect, Zach Lee, apparently off the table, the Cubs are currently asking for Allen Webster as the primary piece from L.A. in a Ryan Dempster deal,’s Jon Morosi reports.

The 22-year-old Webster is 4-8 with a 4.06 ERA and an 85/35 K/BB ratio in 88 2/3 innings for Double-A Chattanooga. Known as a groundball pitcher with his low-90s sinker, he’s given up just one homer all year. Baseball America rated him the team’s No. 2 prospect behind Lee at the beginning of the season.

It wouldn’t be so bad if the Cubs had to settle for Webster instead of getting Randall Delgado from the Braves. While Delgado has better feel for his secondary pitches than Webster does, I still don’t see him getting enough swings and misses to turn into a quality No. 2 or No. 3 starter in the majors. Webster has more upside with his sinker, and if the right coaching allows him to improve either his slider or curve, he could prove to be a big-time pitcher.

Bob Uecker is basically indestructible

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Tom Haurdicourt of the Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel has a story about beloved Brewers broadcaster Bob Uecker’s frighteningly eventful offseason that’s definitely worth a read.

The frightening part: Uecker got bit by a brown recluse spider last October. He didn’t realize it at first and happened to show the bite to a doctor a couple of days later. The doctor realized how serious it was — brown recluses can kill people — and Uecker was rushed off to surgery. He’s fine now, back in the Brewers booth and actually joking about the spider bite.

The incident, though, leads Haudricourt to chronicle all of Uecker’s health issues over the years and the list is fairly amazing. I mean, we’ve written about some of his more recent health issues on this site, but I was unaware of just how many potentially fatal ailments Uecker has dealt with and beat in the past 25-30 years or so. Not that he’s too fazed by it all:

“I know I’m lucky. I’ve had 11 major surgeries overall. But, through all of that stuff, I made some unbelievable friends. All those doctors at Froedtert [Hospital]. We’re all friends now. So, a lot of good came out of it.”

That’s quite the perspective.

Uecker is 84. Counting his playing career he’s entering his 63rd year in baseball. He’s still one of the best, if not the best, broadcasters going. Thank goodness he wasn’t stopped by a spider of all things. Here’s hoping he keeps going for many more years to come.