A’s torch Blue Jays 16-0 for seventh straight win

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The A’s had a nice little thing going over the weekend in sweeping a four-game series against the Yankees. In all, they entered their series against Toronto having won five straight games by exactly one run.

Needless to say, they weren’t content with such efforts against the Blue Jays.

After beating Toronto 7-2 on Tuesday, the A’s handed the franchise its biggest shutout loss in team history Wednesday, winning 16-0.

The A’s busted out for eight runs in the second inning to knock Ricky Romero from the game. They ended up scoring in every inning except the fourth and seventh.

Included in the outburst was Coco Crisp’s third career multi-homer game. Every starter scored at least one run, and everyone except Jemile Weeks drove in a run.

The Jays were forced to turn to catcher Jeff Mathis to pitch the ninth. He gave up two runs and three hits, including Derek Norris’ first career double in his 69th at-bat.

The Jays’ loss eclipsed a 15-0 defeat at the hands of Balitmore in 2006 as the biggest shutout loss in franchise history. Romero gave up eight runs in 1 1/3 innings, the shortest outing of his career. Of the five career outings in which he’s allowed eight or more runs, three have come in the last month.

The A’s scored 16 runs for the first time since beating the Twins 16-1 on July 22, 2009. It was their first shutout win with as many as 16 runs scored since June 26, 2005 against the Giants.

David DeJesus retires

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Outfielder David DeJesus announced his retirement from Major League Baseball on Twitter Wednesday afternoon. He’ll be joining CSN Chicago for Cubs coverage.

DeJesus, 37, spent 13 seasons in the big leagues from 2003-15 with the Royals, Athletics, Cubs, Nationals, Rays, and Angels. He hit a composite .275/.349/.512 with 99 home runs and 573 RBI across 5,916 plate appearances.

We wish the best of luck to DeJesus as he begins a new career in sports media.

Dallas Green: 1934-2017

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Former major league pitcher, manager, and front office executive Dallas Green has died at the age of 82, Jon Heyman of FanRag Sports reports.

Green pitched for the Phillies for the first five years of his career from 1960-64, then went to the Washington Sentators, the Mets, and back to the Phillies before retiring after the ’67 season. He managed the Phillies from 1979-81, leading them to the organization’s first ever championship in ’80. The Cubs hired Green after the 1981 season to serve as executive vice president and general manager. He quit after the ’87 season. Green briefly managed the Yankees in ’89, then took the helm of the Mets from ’93-96.

Green was a controversial figure during his managing and GM days as he was not afraid to say exactly what he was thinking. He got into many conflicts with his players and coaches, but some think it helped the Phillies in the World Series in 1980. The Phillies inducted him into their Wall of Fame in 2006.