After less than four months, the Marlins revert to their old ways

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I tell ya, I woulda lost money if I had bet on the Marlins at the beginning of the season. No, not because they have failed to be a championship team. Rather, because I would have given them at least a year before the sell-off began, not less than four months.

Anibal Sanchez and Omar Infante were traded. Hanley Ramirez is gone. Josh Johnson is being shopped (more on this in a few minutes). All of these may very well end up being wise baseball moves at some point down the road, but coming as they do after all of the money spent to benefit Jeff Loria and the Marlins by Miami taxpayers, all of the hype Loria created and basically demanded and all of the fan attention that, reluctantly, after years of having their hopes crushed by a penny pinching owner, was given to this team, this sell-off is an insult to Marlins fans.

This truly is remarkable. Between 2004 and 2011, the Marlins averaged the lowest payroll in all of baseball. Then they are handed a sweetheart deal on a new stadium, get everyone’s hopes up for the first time in nearly a decade and … after three-plus months, 40% of the rotation, the second baseman, the third baseman and possibly the closer are out the door.  On a team that can more accurately be described as underperforming as opposed to fatally-flawed. A team that, if the roster they had three days ago was kept together, could reasonably be expected to play better baseball in the second half and into next season but now won’t get to.

Someone, somewhere, explain to me why anyone in Miami should give a flying fish about the Marlins?  What possible reason should any baseball fan in south Florida have for giving a dime to a team run by Jeff Loria?

Brandon Phillips hit his 200th career home run

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Braves second baseman Brandon Phillips became the 337th player in baseball history to hit 200 career home runs, driving a solo home run to left-center field during Monday night’s home game against the Pirates. Phillips is the 14th second baseman (who played a min. of 75 percent of his career games at the position) to rack up at least 200 career home runs.

Phillips, 35, entered Monday’s action batting .290/.345/.405 with two home runs and 12 RBI in 142 plate appearances. If he’s anything, he’s consistent, as he finished with an adjusted OPS between 90-99 (100 is average) every year between 2012-16 and it was sitting at 97 coming into Monday.

Video: Albert Almora, Jr. lays out to make a great catch in deep right-center field

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Cubs center fielder Albert Almora, Jr. robbed Giants first baseman Brandon Belt of at least a double in the top of the first inning of Monday’s game at Wrigley Field. Almora completely left his feet to catch the ball before landing just shy of the warning track.

The Giants took the early lead two batters prior to Belt’s at-bat as Joe Panik hit a solo home run to center field.