Here’s the holdup: Ryan Dempster wants to go to the Dodgers

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What we have here is … a failure to communicate.

Someone with the Cubs assumed that Ryan Dempster was going to be OK going to the Braves. If they didn’t think that, they wouldn’t have gotten a deal in place yesterday. But Ken Rosenthal reports that, nope, that’s not what Dempster wants:

Chicago Cubs right-hander Ryan Dempster does not want to be traded to the Atlanta Braves, according to major-league sources.

At least not right now.

Dempster, as a player with 10 years of major-league service, the last five with the same team, has the right to block a trade to the Braves. The pitcher instead wants to be sent to the Los Angeles Dodgers, who were unable to reach agreement with the Cubs on a suitable deal, sources said.

Rosenthal says that the Dodgers are interested, but a deal could not be struck before the Cubs started talking to the Braves, who are thought to be Dempster’s second choice.  Which just means that the Cubs’ chances of getting a good deal here are way less today than they were yesterday.  I mean, if you’re the Dodgers, you bid low, right?  And if you’re the Braves, you pull back on stakes as rich as Randall Delgado now that you know how desperate the Cubs will be if and when they get back to you?

Ten-and-five rights: powerful things.

But we can at least dispense with the notion that Dempster was “blindsided” here, right?

Troy Tulowitzki poses as a pitcher on photo day

Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images
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Update: The photographer was apparently in on the action, according to Topps. Still pretty funny. (Hat tip: Mike Ashmore)

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Thursday marked photo day for the Blue Jays. There are always some oddities, usually when the players create fun for themselves. This time, the fun happened when a photographer mistook shortstop Troy Tulowitzki for a pitcher. Tulowitzki rolled with it and followed the photographer’s instructions to pose like a pitcher.

Hazel Mae has the hilarious video:

Hitters, of course, typically pose with a bat over their shoulder. Pitchers typically have their hand in their glove, sometimes leaning forward as if receiving the signs from their catcher.

Tulowitzki has exclusively played shortstop during his 12-year career in the majors, but perhaps one day he’ll step on the mound and be able to call himself a pitcher.